Contents 1 Overview 2 Detailed list 2.1 Subatomic 2.2 Atomic to cellular 2.3 Cellular to human scale 2.4 Human to astronomical scale 2.5 Astronomical 3 1 yoctometre 4 10 yoctometres 5 100 yoctometres 6 1 zeptometre 7 10 zeptometres 8 100 zeptometres 9 1 attometre 10 10 attometres 11 100 attometres 12 1 femtometre 13 10 femtometres 14 100 femtometres 15 1 picometre 16 10 picometres 17 100 picometres 18 1 nanometre 19 10 nanometres 20 100 nanometres 21 1 micrometre 22 10 micrometres 23 100 micrometres 24 1 millimetre 25 1 centimetre 26 1 decimetre 26.1 Conversions 26.2 Wavelengths 26.3 Human-defined scales and structures 26.4 Nature 26.5 Astronomical 27 1 metre 27.1 Conversions 27.2 Human-defined scales and structures 27.3 Sports 27.4 Nature 27.5 Astronomical 28 1 decametre 28.1 Conversions 28.2 Human-defined scales and structures 28.3 Sports 28.4 Nature 28.5 Astronomical 29 1 hectometre 29.1 Conversions 29.2 Human-defined scales and structures 29.3 Sports 29.4 Nature 29.5 Astronomical 30 1 kilometre 30.1 Conversions 30.2 Human-defined scales and structures 30.3 Geographical 30.4 Astronomical 31 10 kilometres 31.1 Conversions 31.2 Sports 31.3 Human-defined scales and structures 31.4 Geographical 31.5 Astronomical 32 100 kilometres 32.1 Conversions 32.2 Human-defined scales and structures 32.3 Geographical 32.4 Astronomical 33 1 megametre 33.1 Conversions 33.2 Human-defined scales and structures 33.3 Sports 33.4 Geographical 33.5 Astronomical 34 10 megametres 34.1 Conversions 34.2 Human-defined scales and structures 34.3 Geographical 34.4 Astronomical 35 100 megametres 36 1 gigametre 37 10 gigametres 38 100 gigametres 39 1 terametre 40 10 terametres 41 100 terametres 42 1 petametre 43 10 petametres 44 100 petametres 45 1 exametre 46 10 exametres 47 100 exametres 48 1 zettametre 49 10 zettametres 50 100 zettametres 51 1 yottametre 52 10 yottametres 53 100 yottametres 54 Notes 55 See also 56 References 57 External links


Overview[edit] Section Range (m) Unit Example Items ≥ < Planck length – 10−35 ℓP Quantum foam (This is a fixed quantity, not a range.) Subatomic – 10−18 am(10−18) Electron, quark, string Atomic and cellular 10−15 10−12 fm Atomic nucleus, proton, neutron 10−12 10−9 pm Wavelength of gamma rays and X-rays, hydrogen atom 10−9 10−6 nm DNA helix, virus, wavelength of optical spectrum Human scale 10−6 10−3 μm Bacterium, fog water droplet, human hair's diameter[note 1] 10−3 1 mm mosquito, golf ball, domestic cat, violin, viola, football 100 103 m cello, piano, human, automobile, sperm whale, football field, Eiffel Tower 103 106 km Mount Everest, length of Panama Canal and Trans-Siberian Railway, larger asteroid Astronomical 106 109 Mm The Moon, Earth, one light-second 109 1012 Gm Sun, one light-minute, Earth's orbit 1012 1015 Tm Orbits of outer planets, Solar System 1015 1018 Pm One light-year; distance to Proxima Centauri 1018 1021 Em Galactic arm 1021 1024 Zm Milky Way, distance to Andromeda Galaxy 1024 Ym Huge-LQG, Hercules-Corona Borealis Great Wall, visible universe


Detailed list[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, the following list describes various lengths between 1.6×10−35 meters and 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}} meters. Subatomic[edit] Factor (m) Multiple Value Item 10−35 1 Planck Length 0.0000000000162 ym (1.62×10−35 m) Planck length; typical scale of hypothetical loop quantum gravity or size of a hypothetical string and of branes; according to string theory lengths smaller than this do not make any physical sense.[1] Quantum foam is thought to exist at this level. 10−24 1 yoctometre (ym) 20 ym (2 × 10−23 metres) Effective cross section radius of 1 MeV neutrinos[2] 10−21 1 zeptometre (zm) Preons, hypothetical particles proposed as subcomponents of quarks and leptons; the upper bound for the width of a cosmic string in string theory. 7 zm (7 × 10−21 metres) Effective cross section radius of high energy neutrinos[3] 310 zm (3.10 × 10−19 metres) De Broglie wavelength of protons at the Large Hadron Collider (4 TeV as of 2012[update]) 10−18 1 attometre (am) Upper limit for the size of quarks and electrons Sensitivity of the LIGO detector for gravitational waves[4] Upper bound of the typical size range for "fundamental strings"[1] 10−17 10 am Range of the weak force 10−16 100 am 850 am Approximate proton radius[5] Atomic to cellular[edit] Factor (m) Multiple Value Item 10−15 1 femtometre (fm) 1.5 fm Size of an 11 MeV proton[6] 2.81794 fm Classical electron radius[7] 1.75 to 15 fm Diameter range of the atomic nucleus[1][8] 10−12 1 picometre (pm) 0.75 to 0.8225 pm Longest wavelength of gamma rays 1 pm Distance between atomic nuclei in a white dwarf 2.4 pm Compton wavelength of electron 5 pm Wavelength of shortest X-rays 10−11 10 pm 25 pm Radius of hydrogen atom 31 pm Radius of helium atom 53 pm Bohr radius 10−10 100 pm 100 pm (0.1 nm) 1 Ångström (also covalent radius of sulfur atom[9]) 154 pm (0.154 nm) Length of a typical covalent bond (C–C). 280 pm (0.28 nm) Average size of the water molecule, actual lengths may vary. 500 pm (0.50 nm) Width of protein α helix 10−9 1 nanometre (nm) 1 nm Diameter of a carbon nanotube[10] 2 nm Diameter of the DNA helix[11] 2.5 nm Smallest microprocessor transistor gate oxide thickness (as of January 2007[update]) 3.4 nm Length of a DNA turn (10 bp)[12] 6–10 nm Thickness of cell membrane 10−8 10 nm 10 nm Thickness of cell wall in Gram-negative bacteria[citation needed] 10 nm As of 2016[update], the 10 nanometre was the smallest semiconductor device fabrication node[13] 40 nm Extreme ultraviolet wavelength 50 nm Flying height of the head of a hard disk.[14] 10−7 100 nm 121.6 nm Wavelength of the Lyman-alpha line[15] 120 nm Typical diameter of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)[16] 400–700 nm Approximate wavelength range of visible light[17] Cellular to human scale[edit] Factor (m) Multiple Value Item 10−6 1 micrometre (μm) (also called one micron) 1–4 μm Typical length of a bacterium[18] 4 μm Typical diameter of spider silk[19] 7 μm Typical size of a red blood cell[20] 10−5 10 μm 10 μm Typical size of a fog, mist or cloud water droplet 10 μm Width of transistors in the Intel 4004, the world's first commercial microprocessor 12 μm Width of acrylic fiber 17-181 μm Width range of human hair[21] 10−4 100 μm 340 μm Size of a single pixel on a 17-inch monitor with a resolution of 1024×768 560 μm Thickness of the central area of a human cornea[22] 750 μm Maximum diameter of Thiomargarita namibiensis, the largest bacterium ever discovered (as of 2010[update]) 10−3 1 millimetre (mm) 1.5 mm Length of an average flea[23] 2.54 mm 1/10th inch; distance between pins in DIP (dual-inline-package) electronic components 5.70 mm Diameter of the projectile in 5.56×45mm NATO ammunition 10−2 1 centimetre (cm) 2 cm Approximate width of an adult human finger 5.4 cm x 8.6 cm Dimensions of a credit card, according to the ISO/IEC 7810 ID-1 standard 7.3–7.5 cm Diameter of a baseball, according to Major League Baseball guidelines[24] 10−1 1 decimetre (dm) 1.2 dm = 12 cm Diameter of a Compact Disk 9 dm = 90 cm Average length of a rapier, a fencing sword[25] 6.6 dm = 66 cm Length of the longest pine cones, produced by the sugar pine[26] Human to astronomical scale[edit] Factor (m) Multiple Value Item 1 1 metre 1 m (exactly) since 1983, defined as length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299 792 458 of a second. See History of the metre for previous definitions. 2.72 m Height of Robert Wadlow, tallest known human being.[27] 8.38 m Length of a London bus (AEC Routemaster). 101 1 decametre (dam) 33 m Length of the longest known blue whale.[28] 52 m Height of the Niagara Falls.[29] 93.47 m Height of the Statue of Liberty. 102 1 hectometre (hm) 105 m Length of a typical football field. 137 m (147 m) Height (present and original) of the Great Pyramid of Giza. 300 m Height of the Eiffel Tower, one of the famous monuments of Paris. 979 m Height of the Salto Angel, the world's highest free-falling waterfall (Venezuela) 103 1 kilometre (km) 2.3 km Axial length of the Three Gorges Dam, the largest dam in the world[30] 3.1 km Narrowest width of the Strait of Messina, separating Italy and Sicily. 8.848 km Height of Mount Everest, the highest mountain on Earth. 104 10 km 10.9 km Depth of the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point on Earth's surface. 27 km Circumference of the Large Hadron Collider, as of May 2010[update] the largest and highest energy particle accelerator. 42 km Length of a marathon. 105 100 km 100 km The distance the IAU considers to be the limit to space, called the Karman line. 163 km Length of the Suez Canal, connecting the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea. 491 km Length of the Pyrenees, the mountain range separating Spain and France. 974.6 km Greatest diameter of the dwarf planet Ceres.[31] Astronomical[edit] Factor (m) Multiple Value Item 106 1,000 km = 1 megametre (Mm) 2,390 km = 2.39 Mm Diameter of dwarf planet Pluto, formerly the smallest planet category[note 2] in the Solar System 3,480 km= 3.48 Mm Diameter of the Moon 5,200 km = 5.2 Mm Typical distance covered by the winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans automobile endurance race 6,400 km = 6.4 Mm Length of the Great Wall of China 6,600 km = 6.6 Mm Approximate length of the two longest rivers, the Nile and the Amazon 7,821 km = 7.821 Mm Length of the Trans-Canada Highway 9,288 km = 9.288 Mm Length of the Trans-Siberian Railway, longest in the world 107 10,000 km 12,756 km Equatorial diameter of Earth 40,075 km Length of Earth's equator 108 100,000 km 142,984 km Diameter of Jupiter 299.792 km = 299 Mm Distance traveled by light in one second 384,000 km = 384 Mm Moon's orbital distance from Earth 109 1 million km = 1 gigametre (Gm) 1,390,000 km = 1.39 Gm Diameter of the Sun 4,800,000 km = 4.8 Gm Greatest mileage ever recorded by a car (3 million miles by a 1966 Volvo P-1800S, still driving) 1010 10 million km 18 million km Approximately one light-minute 1011 100 million km 150 million km = 150 Gm 1 astronomical unit (AU); mean distance between Earth and Sun ~ 900 Gm Optical diameter of Betelgeuse (~600 × Sun) 1012 1 billion km = 1 terametre (Tm) 1.4 ×109 km = 1.4 Tm Orbital distance of Saturn from Sun 1.96 ×109 km = 1.96 Tm Estimated optical diameter of VY Canis Majoris (1420 × Sun) 2.3 ×109 km = 2.3 Tm Estimated optical diameter of NML Cygni (1650 × Sun) 2.37 ×109 km = 2.37 Tm Median point of the optical diameter of UY Scuti, as of 2016 the largest known star 5.9 ×109 km = 5.9 Tm Orbital distance of Pluto from Sun ~ 7.5 ×109 km = 7.5 Tm Outer boundary of the Kuiper belt, inner boundary of the Oort cloud (~ 50 AU) 1013 10 Tm Diameter of the Solar System as a whole[1] 16.25×109 km = 16.25 Tm Distance of the Voyager 1 spacecraft from Sun (as of Feb 2009[update]), the farthest man-made object so far[32] 62.03×109 km = 62.03 Tm Estimated radius of the event horizon of the supermassive black hole in NGC 4889, the largest known black hole to date 1014 100 Tm 1.8×1011 km = 180 Tm Size of the debris disk around the star 51 Pegasi [33] 2×1011 km = 200 Tm Total length of DNA molecules in all cells of an adult human body [34] 1015 1 petametre (Pm) ~ 7.5 ×1012 km = 7.5 Pm Supposed outer boundary of the Oort cloud (~ 50,000 AU) 9.46×1012 km = 9.46 Pm = 1 light year Distance traveled by light in one year; at its current speed, Voyager 1 would need 17,500 years to travel this distance 1016 10 Pm 3.2616 light-years (3.0857×1013 km = 30.857 Pm) 1 parsec 4.22 light-years = 39.9 Pm Distance to nearest star (Proxima Centauri) 4.37 light-years = 41.3 Pm As of March 2013, distance to nearest discovered extrasolar planet (Alpha Centauri Bc) 1017 100 Pm 20.4 light-years = 193 Pm As of October 2010, distance to nearest discovered extrasolar planet with potential to support life as we know it (Gliese 581 d) 65 light-years = 6.15×1017 m = 615 Pm Approximate radius of humanity's radio bubble, caused by high-power TV broadcasts leaking through the atmosphere into outer space 1018 1 exametre (Em) 200 light-years = 1.9 Em Distance to nearby solar twin (HIP 56948), a star with properties virtually identical to our Sun [35] 1019 10 Em 1,000 light-years = 9.46 Em or 9.46 × 1015 km Average thickness of Milky Way Galaxy[36] (1000 to 3000 ly by 21 cm observations[37]) 1020 100 Em 12,000 light-years = 113.5 Em or 1.135 × 1017 km Thickness of Milky Way Galaxy's gaseous disk[38] 950 Em 100,000 light-years Diameter of galactic disk of Milky Way Galaxy[1] 1021 1 zettametre (Zm) 50 kiloparsecs Distance to SN 1987A, the most recent naked eye supernova 52 kiloparsecs = 1.62×1021 m = 1.62 Zm Distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (a dwarf galaxy orbiting the Milky Way) 54 kiloparsecs = 1.66 Zm Distance to the Small Magellanic Cloud (another dwarf galaxy orbiting the Milky Way) 200 kiloparsecs = 6.15 Zm Diameter of the low surface brightness disc halo of the giant spiral galaxy Malin 1 1022 10 Zm 13.25 Zm = 1.4 million light years = 600 kiloparsecs Radius of the diffuse stellar halo of IC 1101, one of the largest known galaxies 24 Zm = 2.5 million light-years = 770 kiloparsecs Distance to Andromeda Galaxy 3.26 million light-years =30.8 Zm = 1 megaparsec 1 megaparsec 50 Zm (1.6 Mpc) Diameter of Local Group of galaxies 1023 100 Zm 300–600 Zm = 10–20 megaparsecs Distance to Virgo cluster of galaxies 1024 1 yottametre (Ym) 200 million light-years = 1.9 Ym = 61 megaparsecs Diameter of the Local Supercluster and the largest voids and filaments. 300 million light-years = 2.8 Ym = 100 megaparsecs End of Greatness 550 million light-years ~170 megaparsecs ~5 Ym Diameter of the Horologium Supercluster[39] 1 billion light-years = 9.46 Ym =306 megaparsecs Diameter of the Pisces–Cetus Supercluster Complex, the supercluster complex where we live. 1025 10 Ym 1.37 billion light years = 1.3×1025 m = 13 Ym Length of the Sloan Great Wall, a giant wall of galaxies (galactic filament).[40] 3.26 billion light years =30.8 Ym = 1 gigaparsec 1 gigaparsec 4 billion light years =37.84 Ym Length of the Huge-LQG, a group of 73 quasars 1026 100 Ym 1×1010 light-years = 9.5×1025 m = 95 Ym Estimated light travel distance to certain quasars. Length of the Hercules-Corona Borealis Great Wall, a colossal wall of galaxies, the largest and the most massive structure in the observable universe as of 2014. 13.42 billion light years =1.27×1026 m = 127 Ym Estimated light travel distance to UDFj-39546284, the most distant object ever observed 9.2×1010 light years = 8.7×1026 m = 870 Ym Approximate diameter (comoving distance) of the visible universe[1] 1027 1000 Ym 130 billion light years = 1.2×1027 m = 1200 Ym Lower bound of the (possibly infinite) radius of the universe, if it is a 3-sphere, according to one estimate using the WMAP data at 95% confidence.[41] It equivalently implies that there are at minimum 21 particle horizon-sized volumes in the universe. 10 10 115 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{115}}} [note 3] 10 10 115 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{115}}} Ym 10 10 115 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{115}}} megaparsecs = 10 10 115 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{115}}}  m = 10 10 115 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{115}}} Ym According to the laws of probability, the distance one must travel until one encounters a volume of space identical to our observable universe with conditions identical to our own.[42][43] 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}} [note 3] 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}} Ym 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}} Mpc = 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}}  m = 10 10 10 122 {\displaystyle 10^{10^{10^{122}}}} Ym Maximum size of universe after cosmological inflation, implied by one resolution of the No-Boundary Proposal[44]


1 yoctometre[edit] This Wikipedia series on orders of magnitude does not have a range of shorter distances To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths shorter than 10−23 m (10 ym). 1.6 × 10−11 yoctometres (1.6 × 10−35 metres) – the Planck length (Measures of distance shorter than this are considered nonsensical and do not make any physical sense, according to current theories of physics). 1 ym – 1 yoctometre, the smallest named subdivision of the metre in the SI base unit of length, one septillionth of a metre. 1 ym – length of a neutrino.


10 yoctometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−23 metres and 10−22 metres (10 ym and 100 ym). 20 ym – the effective cross-section radius of 1 MeV neutrinos as measured by Clyde Cowan and Frederick Reines


100 yoctometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−22 m and 10−21 m (100 ym and 1 zm). 100 ym – length of a top quark, one of the smallest known quarks


1 zeptometre[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−21 m and 10−20 m (1 zm and 10 zm). 2 zm – length of a preon, hypothetical particles proposed as subcomponents of quarks and leptons; the upper bound for the width of a cosmic string in string theory. 2 zm – radius of effective cross section for a 20 GeV neutrino scattering off a nucleon 7 zm – radius of effective cross section for a 250 GeV neutrino scattering off a nucleon


10 zeptometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−20 m and 10−19 m (10 zm and 100 zm). 15 zm – length of a high energy neutrino 30 zm – length of a bottom quark


100 zeptometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−19 m and 10−18 m (100 zm and 1 am). 177 zm – de Broglie wavelength of protons at the Large Hadron Collider (7 TeV as of 2010)


1 attometre[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−18 m and 10−17 m (1 am and 10 am). 1 am – sensitivity of the LIGO detector for gravitational waves 1 am – Upper limit for the size of quarks and electrons 1 am – Upper bound of the typical size range for "fundamental strings" 1 am – length of an electron 1 am – length of an up quark 1 am – length of a down quark


10 attometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−17 m and 10−16 m (10 am and 100 am). 10 am – range of the weak force


100 attometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−16 m and 10−15 m (100 am and 1 fm). 100 am – all lengths shorter than this distance are not conformed in terms of size 850 am – approximate proton radius


1 femtometre[edit] The femtometre (American spelling: femtometer; symbol fm) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to 10−15 metres. In particle physics, this unit is more commonly called a fermi, also with abbreviation "fm". To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−15 metres and 10−14 metres (1 femtometre (fm) and 10 fm). 1 fm – length of a proton 1 fm – length of a neutron 1.5 fm – diameter of the scattering cross section of an 11 MeV proton with a target proton 2.81794 fm – classical electron radius 7 fm – the radius of the effective scattering cross section for a gold nucleus scattering a 6 MeV alpha particle over 140 degrees


10 femtometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−14 m and 10−13 m (10 fm and 100 fm). 1.75 to 15 fm – Diameter range of the atomic nucleus


100 femtometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−13 m and 10−12 m (100 fm and 1 pm).  ? – Compton wavelength of electron


1 picometre[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−12 and 10−11 m (1 pm and 10 pm). 1 pm – distance between atomic nuclei in a white dwarf 2.4 pm – The Compton wavelength of the electron. 5 pm – shorter X-ray wavelengths (approx.)


10 picometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−11 and 10−10 m (10 pm and 100 pm). 10 pm – side of a square with area 100 pm2 25 pm – radius of a helium atom 50 pm – radius of a hydrogen atom 50 pm – radius of an oxygen atom 50 pm – bohr radius ~50 pm – best resolution of a high-resolution transmission electron microscope 60 pm – radius of a carbon atom 93 pm – length of a dicarbon molecule


100 picometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−10 and 10−9 m (100 pm and 1 nm). 100 pm – 1 Ångström 100 pm – covalent radius of sulfur atom 120 pm – van der Waals radius of a neutral hydrogen atom 120 pm – radius of a gold atom 126 pm – covalent radius of ruthenium atom 135 pm – covalent radius of technetium atom 150 pm – Length of a typical covalent bond (C–C) 153 pm – covalent radius of silver atom 155 pm – covalent radius of zirconium atom 175 pm – covalent radius of thulium atom 200 pm – highest resolution of a typical electron microscope 225 pm – covalent radius of caesium atom 280 pm – Average size of the water molecule 298 pm – radius of a caesium atom, the largest known atom. 340 pm – thickness of single layer graphene 356.68 pm – width of diamond cell (unit cell) 403 pm – width of lithium fluoride cell 500 pm – Width of protein α helix 543 pm – silicon lattice spacing 560 pm – width of sodium chloride cell 700 pm – width of glucose molecule 780 pm – mean width of quartz cell 820 pm – mean width of ice cell 900 pm – mean width of coesite cell 1000 pm – length of a Buckyball


1 nanometre[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−9 and 10−8 m (1 nm and 10 nm). 1 nm –10 Ångströms 1 nm – side of square with area of 1 nm2 1 nm – edge of cube with volume 1 nm3 1 nm – diameter of a carbon nanotube 1 nm – roughly the length of a sucrose molecule, calculated by Albert Einstein 2.3 nm – length of a phospholipid 2.3 nm – Smallest microprocessor transistor gate oxide thickness 3 nm – width of a DNA helix 3 nm – flying height of the head of a hard disk 3.4 nm – length of a DNA turn (10 bp) 3.8 nm – size of an albumin protein molecule 5 nm – size of the gate length of a 16 nm processor 6 nm – length of a phospholipid bilayer 6-10 nm – thickness of cell membrane 6.8 nm – width of a haemoglobin molecule 10 nm Thickness of cell wall in Gram-negative bacteria


10 nanometres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−8 and 10−7 m (10 nm and 100 nm). 10 nm – 100 angstrom 10 nm – side of square of area 10−16 m2 10 nm – edge of cube of area 6 * 10−16 m2 and volume 10−24 m3 10 nm – radius of circle of area 3.14 * 10−16 m2 10 nm – radius of sphere of area 12.56 * 10−16 m2 and volume 4.19 * 10−24 m3 10 nm – the average length of a nanowire 10 nm – lower size of tobacco smoke[45] 11 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell speculated to be manufactured in 2015. 13 nm – the length of the wavelength that is used for EUV lithiography 14 nm – Length of a porcine circovirus 15 nm – Length of an antibody 16 nm – technology is projected to be reached by semiconductor companies in the 2013 timeframe 18 nm – diameter of tobacco mosaic virus[46] (Generally, viruses range in size from 20 nm to 450 nm.)[citation needed] 20 nm – Length of a nanobe, could be one of the smallest forms of life 20 nm to 80 nm – thickness of cell wall in Gram-positive bacteria[47] 20 nm – thickness of bacterial flagellum 22 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell expected to be manufactured at around the 2011–2011 time frame. 22 nm – Smallest feature size of production microprocessors in September 2009[48] 30 nm – lower size of cooking oil smoke 32 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2009–2010 time frame. 40 nm – extreme ultraviolet wavelength 45 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2007–2008 time frame. 50 nm – upper size for airborne virus particles 50 nm – flying height of the head of a hard disk[49] 65 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2005–2006 time frame. 58 nm – height of a T7 bacteriophage 90 nm – Length of a HIV virus 90 nm – Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (generally, viruses range in size from 20 nm to 450 nm) 90 nm – the average half-pitch of a memory cell manufactured at around the 2002–2003 time frame. 100 nm – Length of a Mesoporous silica.


100 nanometres[edit] Comparison of sizes of semiconductor manufacturing process nodes with some microscopic objects and visible light wavelengths. At this scale, the width of a human hair is about 10 times that of the image.[50] To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−7 and 10−6 m (100 nm and 1 µm). 100 nm – greatest particle size that can fit through a surgical mask[51] 100 nm – 90% of particles in wood smoke are smaller than this.[citation needed] 120 nm – greatest particle size that can fit through a ULPA filter[citation needed] 120 nm – diameter of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [52] 125 nm – standard depth of pits on compact discs (width: 500 nm, length: 850 nm to 3.5 µm) 180 nm – typical length of the rabies virus 200 nm – typical size of a Mycoplasma bacterium, among the smallest bacteria 300–400 nm – near ultraviolet wavelength 300 nm – greatest particle size that can fit through a HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter (N100 removes up to 99.97% at 0.3 micrometres, N95 removes up to 95% at 0.3 micrometres)[citation needed] 400–420 nm – wavelength of violet light (see color and visible spectrum) 420–440 nm – wavelength of indigo light (see color and visible spectrum) 440–500 nm – wavelength of blue light (see color and visible spectrum) 500–520 nm – wavelength of cyan light (see color and visible spectrum) 520–565 nm – wavelength of green light (see color and visible spectrum) 565–590 nm – wavelength of yellow light (see color and visible spectrum) 590–625 nm – wavelength of orange light (see color and visible spectrum) 625–700 nm – wavelength of red light (see color and visible spectrum) 700–1.4 µm – wavelength of near-infrared radiation


1 micrometre[edit] The silk for a spider's web is around 5-7 μ m wide. To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists some items with lengths between 10−6 and 10−5 m (between 1 and 10 micrometres, or µm). ~0.7–300 µm – wavelength of infrared radiation 1 µm – the side of square of area 10−12 m2 1 µm – edge of cube of volume 10−18 m3 (1 fL) 1–10 µm – diameter of a typical bacterium[citation needed] 1 µm – length of a lysosome 2 µm – length of an average E. coli bacteria 3–4 µm – size of a typical yeast cell[53] 5 µm – length of a typical human spermatozoon's head [54] 6 µm – anthrax spore[citation needed] 7 µm – diameter of the nucleus of a typical eukaryotic cell[citation needed] about 7 μm – diameter of human red blood cells [55] 3–8 µm – width of strand of spider web silk[56] 8 µm – width of a chloroplast[citation needed] 9 µm – thickness of the tape in a 120-minute compact cassette.[citation needed] about 10 µm – size of a fog, mist or cloud water droplet[citation needed]


10 micrometres[edit] Fog particles are around 10-50 µm long. To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists lengths between 10−5 m and 10−4 m (10 µm and 100 µm). 10 µm – width of cotton fibre[57] 10 µm – transistor width of the Intel 4004, the world's first commercial microprocessor 10 µm – mean longest dimension of a human red blood cell[citation needed] 5–20 µm – dust mite excreta[58] 10.6 µm – wavelength of light emitted by a carbon dioxide laser 15 µm – width of silk fibre[citation needed] 17 µm – minimum width of a strand of human hair[21] 17.6 µm – one twip, a unit of length in typography 10 to 55 µm – width of wool fibre[57] 25.4 µm – 1/1000 inch, commonly referred to as 1 mil in the U.S. and 1 thou in the UK 30 µm – length of a human skin cell 50 µm – typical length of Euglena gracilis, a flagellate protist[citation needed] 50 µm – typical length of a human liver cell, an average-sized body cell[citation needed] 50 µm – length of a silt particle 60 µm – length of a sperm cell 70 to 180 µm – thickness of paper


100 micrometres[edit] A paramecium is around 300 µm long. To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists lengths between 10−4 m and 10−3 m (100 µm and 1 mm). The term Myriometre (equivalent to 100 micrometers) is deprecated; the decimal metric prefix myrio-[59] is obsolete[60][61][62] and not included among the prefixes when the International System of Units was introduced in 1960. 100 µm – 1/10 of a millimetre 100 µm – 0.00394 inches 100 µm – smallest distance that can be seen with the naked eye 100 µm – average diameter of a strand of human hair[21] 100 µm – thickness of a coat of paint 100 µm – length of a dust particle 110 µm – halfway between the Planck scale and the diameter of the Observable universe, √(8.8×1026meters/1.6×10−35meters) × 1.6×10−35 meters=110 µm 120 µm – diameter of a human ovum 170 µm – length of the largest sperm cell in nature, belonging to the Drosophila bifurca fruit fly[63][64] 181 µm – maximum width of a strand of human hair[21] 100–400 µm – length of Demodex mites living in human hair follicles 200 µm – typical length of Paramecium caudatum, a ciliate protist 250–300 µm – length of a dust mite[65] 340 µm – length of a single pixel on a 17-inch monitor with a resolution of 1024×768 500 µm – typical length of Amoeba proteus, an amoeboid protist 500 µm – MEMS micro-engine[citation needed] 500 µm – average length of a grain of sand 500 µm – average length of a grain of salt 500 µm – average length of a grain of sugar 560 µm – thickness of the central area of a human cornea[66] 750 µm – diameter of a Thiomargarita namibiensis, the largest bacteria known[67] 760 µm – thickness of an identification card


1 millimetre[edit] An average ant is about 3-4 mm long. To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−3 m and 10−2 m (1 mm and 1 cm). 1.0 mm – 1/1000 of a metre 1.0 mm – 0.03937 inches or 5/127 (exactly) 1.0 mm – side of square of area 1 mm² 1.0 mm – diameter of a pinhead 1.5 mm – length of average flea[23] 2.54 mm – distance between pins on old DIP (dual-inline-package) electronic components 5 mm – length of an average red ant 5 mm – diameter of an average grain of rice 5.56×45mm NATO – standard ammunition size 6 mm – approximate width of a pencil 7 mm – length of a Paedophryne amauensis, the smallest known vertebrate[68] 7.1 mm – length of a sunflower seed 7.62×51mm NATO – common military ammunition size[69] 8 mm – width of old-format home movie film 8 mm – length of a Paedocypris progenetica, the smallest known fish[70]


1 centimetre[edit] An average human fingernail is about 1 cm wide. To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10−2 m and 10−1 m (1 cm and 10 cm). 1 cm – 10 millimeters 1 cm – 0.39 inches 1 cm – edge of square of area 1 cm2 1 cm – edge of cube of volume 1 ml 1 cm – length of a coffee bean 1 cm – approximate width of average fingernail 1.2 cm – length of a bee 1.2 cm – diameter of a die 1.5 cm – length of a very large mosquito 1.6 cm – length of a Jaragua Sphaero, a very small reptile 1.7 cm – length of a Thorius arboreus, the smallest Salamander[71] 2 cm – approximate width of an adult human finger 2.54 cm – 1 inch 3.1 cm – 1 attoparsec (10−18 parsecs) 3.4 cm – length of a quail egg[72] 3.5 cm – width of film commonly used in motion pictures and still photography 4.3 cm – minimum diameter of a golf ball[73] 5 cm – usual diameter of a chicken egg 5 cm – height of a Hummingbird, the smallest known bird 5.5 × 5.5 × 5.5 cm – dimensions of a 3x3x3 rubik's cube 6.1 cm – average height of an apple 7.3–7.5 cm – diameter of a baseball[24] 8.6 cm × 5.4 cm – dimensions of a standard credit card[74] 9 cm – length of a Speckled Padloper, the smallest known turtle


1 decimetre[edit] "10cm" redirects here. For the band, see 10cm (band). An adult human foot is about 28 centimetres long. To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10 centimetres and 100 centimetres (10−1 metre and 1 metre). Conversions[edit] 10 centimetres (abbreviated to 10 cm) is equal to: 1 decimetre (dm), a term not in common use 100 millimetres 3.9 inches a side of a square of area 0.01 m2 the edge of a cube with a volume of 6997100000000000000♠1×10−3 (one litre) Wavelengths[edit] 10 cm = 1.0 dm – wavelength of the highest UHF radio frequency, 3 GHz 12 cm = 1.2 dm – wavelength of the 2.45 GHz ISM radio band 21 cm = 2.1 dm – wavelength of the 1.4 GHz hydrogen emission line, a hyperfine transition of the hydrogen atom 100 cm = 10 dm – wavelength of the lowest UHF radio frequency, 300 MHz Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 10.16 cm = 1.016 dm – 1 hand used in measuring height of horses (4 inches) 12 cm = 1.2 dm – diameter of a Compact Disc (CD) (= 120 mm) 15 cm = 1.5 dm – length of a Bic pen with cap on 22 cm = 2.2 dm – diameter of a typical Association football (soccer ball) 30 cm = 3 dm – typical school-use ruler length (= 300 mm) 30.48 cm = 3.048 dm – 1 foot (measure) 60 cm = 6 dm – standard depth (front to back) of a domestic kitchen worktop in Europe (= 600 mm) 90 cm = 9 dm – average length of a rapier, a fencing sword[25] 91.44 cm = 9.144 dm – one yard (measure) Nature[edit] 10 cm = 1 dm – diameter of the human cervix upon entering the second stage of labour[citation needed] 11 cm = 1.1 dm – diameter of an average potato 15 cm = 1.5 dm – approximate size of largest beetle species[citation needed] 19 cm = 1.9 dm – length of a banana 29 cm = 2.9 dm – length of average human foot[citation needed] 29.98 cm = 2.998 dm – distance light travels in one nanosecond 31 cm = 3.1 dm – wingspan of largest butterfly species Ornithoptera alexandrae[citation needed] 46 cm = 4.6 dm – length of an average domestic cat 50 to 65 cm = 5–6.5 dm – a pizote's tail[citation needed] 66 cm = 6.6 dm – length of the longest pine cones (produced by the sugar pine[75]) Astronomical[edit] 84 cm = 8.4 dm – approximate diameter of 2008 TS26, a meteoroid


1 metre[edit] Leonardo da Vinci drew the Vitruvian Man within a square of side 1.83 metres and a circle about 1.2 metres in radius To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between one metre and ten metres. Light travels 1 metre in ​1⁄299,792,458, or 3.3356409519815E-9 of a second. Conversions[edit] 1 metre is: 10 decimetres 100 centimetres 1,000 millimetres 39.37 inches 3.28 feet side of square with area 1 m2 edge of cube with surface area 6 m2 and volume 1 m3 radius of circle with area 3.14 m2 radius of sphere with surface area 12.56 m2 and volume 4.19 m3 Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 1 m – approximate height of the top part of a doorknob on a door 1 m – diameter of a very large beach ball 1.435 m – standard gauge of railway track used by about 60% of railways in the world = 4' 8½" 2.5 m – distance from the floor to the celling in an average residential house[76] 2.7 m – length of the Starr Bumble Bee II, the smallest plane 2.77–3.44 m – wavelength of the broadcast radio FM band 87–108 MHz 3.05 m – the length of an old Mini 8.38 m – the length of a London Bus (Routemaster) Sports[edit] 2.44 m – height of an association football goal[77] 2.45 m – highest high jump by a human being (Javier Sotomayor)[78] 3.05 m – (10 feet) height of the basket in basketball 8.95 m – longest long jump by a human being (Mike Powell)[79] Nature[edit] 1 m – height of Homo floresiensis (the "Hobbit") 1.15 m – a pizote (mammal) 1.37 m – average height of an Andamanese person 1.63 m – (5 feet 4 inches) (or 64 inches) - height of average US female human as of 2002[update] (source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)). 1.75 m – (5 feet 8 inches) - height of average US male human as of 2002[update] (source: US CDC as per female above) 2.5 m – height of a sunflower 2.72 m – (8 feet 11 inches) - tallest known human being (Robert Wadlow)[27] 3.63 m – the record wingspan for living birds (a wandering albatross) 5 m – length of an elephant 5.20 m – height of a giraffe[80] 5.5 m – height of a Baluchitherium, the largest land mammal ever lived 7 m – wingspan of Argentavis, the largest flying bird known 7.50 m – approximate length of the human gastrointestinal tract Astronomical[edit] 3–6 m – approximate diameter of 2003 SQ222, a meteoroid 4.1 m – diameter of 2008 TC3, a small asteroid that flew into the Earth's atmosphere on October 7, 2008.[81]


1 decametre[edit] A blue whale has been measured as 33 metres long; this drawing compares its length to that of a human diver and a dolphin To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10 metres and 100 metres. Conversions[edit] 10 metres (very rarely termed a decametre which is abbreviated as dam) is equal to: 10 metres 100 decimetres 1,000 centimetres 10,000 millimetres 32.8 feet side of square with area 100 m² Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 10 metres – wavelength of the highest shortwave radio frequency, 30 MHz 23 metres – height of the obelisk of the Place de la Concorde, Paris, France. 25 metres – wavelength of the broadcast radio shortwave band at 12 MHz 29 metres – height of the lighthouse at Savudrija, Slovenia. 31 metres – wavelength of the broadcast radio shortwave band at 9.7 MHz 34 metres – height of the Split Point Lighthouse in Aireys Inlet, Victoria, Australia. 40 metres – average depth beneath the seabed of the Channel tunnel 49 metres – wavelength of the broadcast radio shortwave band at 6.1 MHz 50 meters – length of a road train 55 metres – height of the Leaning Tower of Pisa 60 metres – height of Pyramid of Djoser[citation needed] 64 metres – wingspan of a Boeing 747-400 69 meters – wingspan of a Antonov An-124 Ruslan 70 metres – length of the Bayeux Tapestry 70 metres – width of a typical football field 77 meters – wingspan of a Boeing 747-8 88.40 metres – wingspan of the Antonov An-225 Mriya transport aircraft 93 meters – height of the Statue of Liberty 96 meters – height of Big Ben 100 metres – wavelength of the lowest shortwave radio frequency, 3 MHz Sports[edit] 11 metres – approximate width of a doubles tennis court 15 metres – width of a standard FIBA basketball court 15.24 metres – width of an NBA basketball court (50 feet) 18.44 metres – distance between the front of the pitcher's rubber and the rear point of home plate on a baseball field (60 feet, 6 inches)[82] 20 metres – length of cricket pitch (22 yards)[83] 27.43 metres – distance between bases on a baseball field (90 feet) 28 metres – length of a standard FIBA basketball court 28.65 metres – length of an NBA basketball court (94 feet) 49 metres – width of an American football field (53⅓ yards) 59.436 metres – width of a Canadian football field (65 yards) 70 metres – typical width of soccer field 91 metres – length of American football field (100 yards, measured between the goal lines) 105 metres – length of football pitch (UEFA Stadium Category 3 and 4) Nature[edit] 10 metres – average length of human digestive tract[citation needed] 12 metres – length of a whale shark, largest living fish 12 metres – wingspan of a Quetzalcoatlus, a pterosaur 13 metres – length of a giant squid and colossal squid, the largest living invertebrates 15 metres – approximate distance the tropical circles of latitude are moving towards the equator and the polar circles are moving towards the poles each year due to a natural, gradual decrease in the Earth's axial tilt 18 metres – height of a Sauroposeidon, the tallest known dinosaur 20 metres – length of a Leedsichthys, the largest known fish ever lived 21 metres – height of High Force waterfall in England 33 metres – length of a blue whale,[84] the largest animal on earth, living or extinct, in terms of mass 35 metres – length of a Supersaurus, the longest known dinosaur and longest vertebrate[citation needed] 40 metres – average depth beneath the seabed of the Channel tunnel[citation needed] 52 metres – height of Niagara Falls[29] 83.34 meters – height of a Western hemlock Astronomical[edit] 30 metres – diameter of 1998 KY26, a rapidly spinning meteoroid 32 meters – approximate diameter of 2008 HJ, a small meteoroid


1 hectometre[edit] The Great Pyramid of Giza is 138.8 metres high. British driver location sign and location marker post on the M27 in Hampshire. The location marker posts are installed at 100-metre intervals[85] To compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 100 metres and 1000 metres (1 kilometre). Conversions[edit] 100 metres (sometimes termed a hectometre) is equal to: 328 feet one side of a 1 hectare square a fifth of a modern li, a Chinese unit of measurement the approximate distance travelled by light in 300 nanoseconds Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 100 metres – wavelength of the highest mediumwave radio frequency, 3 MHz 100 metres – spacing of location marker posts on British motorways 138.8 metres – height of the Great Pyramid of Giza (Pyramid of Cheops) 139 metres – height of the world's tallest roller coaster, Kingda Ka[86] 187 metres– shortest wavelength of the broadcast radio AM band, 1600 kHz 202 metres – length of the Széchenyi Chain Bridge connecting Buda and Pest 318 meters – height of The New York Times Building 318.9 meters – height of the Chrysler Building 320.75 metres – height of the Eiffel Tower(including antenna) [87] 328 metres – height of Auckland's Sky Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the Southern Hemisphere[when?] 341 metres – height of the world's tallest bridge, the Millau Viaduct[when?] 390 metres – height of the Empire State Building 400–800 metres – approximate heights of the world's tallest skyscrapers of the past 80 years[when?] 458 metres – length of the Knock Nevis, the world's largest supertanker 553.33 meters – height of the CN Tower[88] 555 metres – longest wavelength of the broadcast radio AM band, 540 kHz 630 metres – height of the KVLY-TV mast, second tallest structure in the world 646 metres – height of the Warsaw radio mast, the world's tallest structure until its collapse in 1991 828 metres – height of Burj Khalifa, world's tallest structure on 17 January 2009[89] 1,000 metres – wavelength of the lowest mediumwave radio frequency, 300 kHz Sports[edit] 100 metres – the distance a very fast human being can run in about 10 seconds 100.584 metres – length of a Canadian football field between the goal lines (110 yards) 91.5 metres – 137 metres – length of a soccer field[90] 105 metres – length of a typical football field 109.73 metres – total length of an American football field (120 yards, including the end zones) 110 – 150 metres the width of an Australian football field 135 – 185 metres the length of an Australian football field 137.16 metres – total length of a Canadian football field, including the end zones (150 yards) Nature[edit] 115.5 metres – height of the world's tallest tree in 2007, the Hyperion sequoia[91] 310 metres – maximum depth of Lake Geneva 340 metres – distance sound travels in air at sea level in one second; see speed of sound 979 metres – height of the Salto Angel, the world's highest free-falling waterfall (Venezuela) Astronomical[edit] 270 metres – length of 99942 Apophis 535 metres – length of 25143 Itokawa,[92] a small asteroid visited by a spacecraft


1 kilometre[edit] Mount Fuji is 3.776 kilometres (3,776 metres) high To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 1 kilometre and 10 kilometres (103 and 104 metres). Conversions[edit] 1 kilometre (unit symbol km) is equal to: 1,000 metres 0.621371 miles 1,093.61 yards 3,280.84 feet 39,370.1 inches 100,000 centimetres 1,000,000 millimetres Side of a square of area 1 km2. Radius of a circle of area π km2. Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 1 km – wavelength of the highest long wave radio frequency, 300 kHz[93] 1.280 km – span of the Golden Gate Bridge (distance between towers)[94] 1.609 km – 1 mile 1.852 km – 1 nautical mile, equal to 1 arc minute of latitude at the surface of the earth[95] 1.991 km – span of the Akashi Kaikyō Bridge[96] 2.309 km – axial length of the Three Gorges Dam, the largest dam in the world[30] 3.991 km – length of the Akashi Kaikyō Bridge, longest suspension bridge in the world as of December 2008[update][97] 5.072 km – height of Tanggula Mountain Pass, below highest peak in the Tanggula Mountains, highest railway pass in the world as of August 2005[update][98] 5.727 km – height of Cerro Aucanquilcha, highest road in the world, located in Chile[99][not in citation given] 98 airports have paved runways from 4 km to 5.5 km in length. 8 km – length of Palm Jebel Ali, an artificial island built off the coast of Dubai 9.8 km – length of The World, an artificial archipelago that is also built off the coast of Dubai, it's islands resemble a world map Geographical[edit] This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) See also: List of highest mountains 1.637 km – deepest dive of Lake Baikal in Russia, the world's largest fresh water lake.[100] 2.228 km – height of Mount Kosciuszko, highest point in Australia[101] Most of Manhattan is from 3 to 4 km wide. 4.810 km – height of Mont Blanc, highest peak in the Alps 4.884 km – height of Carstensz Pyramid, highest peak in Oceania[102] 4.892 km – height of Mount Vinson, highest peak in Antarctica 5.610 km – height of Mount Damavand, highest peak in Iran 5.642 km – height of Mount Elbrus, highest peak in Europe 5.895 km – height of Mount Kilimanjaro, highest peak in Africa 6.081 km – height of Mount Logan, highest peak in Canada 6.194 km – height of Denali, highest peak in North America 6.959 km – height of Aconcagua, highest peak in South America 7.5 km – depth of Cayman Trench, deepest point in the Caribbean Sea 8.848 km – height of Mount Everest, highest peak on Earth, on the border between Nepal and China Astronomical[edit] 1 km – diameter of 1620 Geographos 1 km – very approximate size of the smallest known moons of Jupiter 1.4 km – diameter of Dactyl, the first confirmed asteroid moon 4.8 km – diameter of 5535 Annefrank, an inner belt asteroid 5 km – diameter of 3753 Cruithne, one of the smallest asteroids 5 km – length of PSR B1257+12 8 km – diameter of Themisto, one of Jupiter's moons 8 km – diameter of the Vela Pulsar 8.6 km – diameter of Callirrhoe, also known as Jupiter XVII 9.737 km – length of PSR B1919+21


10 kilometres[edit] The Strait of Gibraltar is 13 kilometres wide To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths between 10 and 100 kilometres (104 to 105 metres). The myriametre[103] (sometimes also spelled myriameter, myriometre and myriometer) (10,000 metres) is a deprecated unit name; the decimal metric prefix myria-[59] (sometimes also written as myrio-[104][105][106]) is obsolete[60][61][62] and not included among the prefixes when the International System of Units was introduced in 1960. Conversions[edit] 10 kilometres is equal to: Distance marker on the Rhine: 36 (XXXVI) myriametres from Basel. Note that the stated distance is 360 km; comma is the decimal mark in Germany. 10,000 metres 6.2 miles 1 mil (the Scandinavian mile), now standardized as 10 km: 1 mil, the unit of measure commonly used in Norway and Sweden[107] used to be 11,295 m in Norway and 10,688 m in Sweden. farsang, unit of measure commonly used in Iran and Turkey.[108] Sports[edit] 42.195 km – length of the marathon[109] Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 18 km – cruising altitude of Concorde 27 km – circumference of the Large Hadron Collider, as of May 2010[update] the largest and highest energy particle accelerator 34.668 km – highest manned balloon flight (Malcolm D. Ross and Victor E. Prather on 4 May 1961) [110] 38.422 km – length of the Second Lake Pontchartrain Causeway in Louisiana, US 39 km – undersea portion of the Channel tunnel 53.9 km – length of the Seikan Tunnel, as of October 2009[update], the longest rail tunnel in the world[111] 77 km – Rough total length of the Panama Canal[112] Geographical[edit] 10 km – height of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, measured from its base on the ocean floor 11 km – deepest known point of the ocean, Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench 11 km – average height of the troposphere 14 km – width of the Gibraltar strait 21 km – length of Manhattan 23 km – depth of the largest earthquake ever recorded in the United Kingdom, in 1931 at the Dogger Bank of the North Sea 34 km – narrowest width of the English Channel at the Strait of Dover 50 km – approximate height of the stratosphere 90 km – width of the Bering Strait Astronomical[edit] 10 km – diameter of the most massive neutron stars (3–5 solar masses) 13 km – mean diameter of Deimos, the smaller moon of Mars 20 km – diameter of the least massive neutron stars (1.44 solar masses) 20 km – diameter of Leda, one of Jupiter's moons 20 km – diameter of Pan, one of Saturn's moons 22 km – diameter of Phobos, the larger moon of Mars 27 km – height of Olympus Mons above the Mars reference level,[113][114] the highest known mountain of the Solar System 43 km – diameter difference of Earth's equatorial bulge 66 km – diameter of Naiad, the innermost of Neptune's moons


100 kilometres[edit] The Suez Canal is 163 kilometres long A length of 100 kilometres (about 62 miles), as a rough amount, is relatively common in measurements on Earth and for some astronomical objects. It is the altitude at which the FAI defines spaceflight to begin. To help compare orders of magnitude, this section lists lengths between 100 and 1,000 kilometres (105 and 106 metres). Conversions[edit] A distance of 100 kilometres is equal to about 62 miles (or 62.13711922 miles). Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 100 km — the Karman line: the official boundary of outer space 105 km — distance from Giridih to Bokaro 109 km — length of High Speed 1 between London and the Channel Tunnel[115] 130 km — range of a Scud-A missile 163 km — length of the Suez Canal 164 km — length of the Danyang–Kunshan Grand Bridge 213 km — length of Paris Métro 217 km — length of the Grand Union Canal 223 km — length of the Madrid Metro 300 km — range of a Scud-B missile 386 km — altitude of the International Space Station 408 km — length of the London Underground (active track) 460 km — distance from London to Paris 470 km — distance from Dublin to London as the crow flies 600 km — range of a Scud-C missile 600 km — height above ground of the Hubble Space Telescope 804.67 km — (500 miles) distance of the Indy 500 automobile race Geographical[edit] 111 km — distance covered by one degree of latitude on Earth's surface 180 km — distance between Mumbai and Nashik 203 km — length of Sognefjorden, the third largest fjord in the world 220 km — distance between Pune and Nashik 240 km — widest width of the English Channel 430 km — length of the Pyrenees 500 km — widest width of Sweden from east to west 550 km — distance from San Francisco to Los Angeles as the crow flies 560 km — distance of Bordeaux–Paris, formerly[when?] the longest one-day professional cycling race[116] 590 km — length of land boundary between Finland and Sweden 724 km — length of the Om River 871 km — distance from Sydney to Melbourne (along the Hume Highway) 897 km — length of the River Douro 900 km — distance from Berlin to Stockholm 956 km - distance from Washington, DC to Chicago, Illinois as the crow flies Astronomical[edit] 100 km — the altitude at which the FAI defines spaceflight to begin 167 km — diameter of Amalthea, one of Jupiter's inner moons 200 km — width of Valles Marineris 220 km — diameter of Phoebe, the largest of Saturn's outer moons 300 km — the approximate distance travelled by light in one millisecond 340 km — diameter of Nereid, the third largest moon of Neptune 350 km — lower bound of Low Earth orbit 420 km — diameter of Proteus, the second largest moon of Neptune 468 km — diameter of the asteroid 4 Vesta 472 km — diameter of Miranda, one of Uranus' major moons 974.6 km — greatest diameter of 1 Ceres,[117] the largest solar system asteroid[note 2]


1 megametre[edit] Small planets, the Moon and dwarf planets in our solar system have diameters from one to ten million metres. Top row: Mars (left), Mercury (right); bottom row: Moon (left), Pluto (center), and Haumea (right), to scale. To help compare different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths starting at 106 m (1 Mm or 1,000 km). Conversions[edit] 1 megametre is equal to: 1 E+6 m (one million metres) approximately 621.37 miles Side of square with area 1,000,000 km2 Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 1.000 Mm – Length of 1 megameter 2.100 Mm – Length of proposed gas pipeline from Iran to India via Pakistan 2.100 Mm – Distance from Casablanca to Rome 2.288 Mm – Length of the official Alaska Highway when it was built in the 1940s[118] 3.069 Mm – Length of Interstate 95 (from Houlton, Maine to Miami, Florida) 3.846 Mm – Length of U.S. Route 1 (from Fort Kent, Maine to Key West, Florida) 5.000 Mm – Width of the United States 5.007 Mm – Estimated length of Interstate 90 (Seattle, Washington to Boston, Massachusetts) 5.614 Mm – Length of the Australian Dingo Fence[119] 6.4 Mm – Length of the Great Wall of China 7.821 Mm – Length of the Trans-Canada Highway, the world's longest national highway (from Victoria, British Columbia to St. John's, Newfoundland) 8.836 Mm – Road distance between Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, and Key West, Florida, the endpoints of the U.S. road network 8.852 Mm – Aggregate length of the Great Wall of China, including trenches, hills and rivers[120] 9.259 Mm – Length of the Trans-Siberian railway[121] Sports[edit] The Munda Biddi Trail in WA, Australia is over 1000 km long - the world's longest off-road cycle trail 1.200 Mm – the length of the Paris–Brest–Paris bicycling event Several endurance auto races are, or were, run for 1,000 km: Bathurst 1000 1000 km Brands Hatch 1000 km Buenos Aires 1000 km Donington 1000 km Monza 1000 km Nürburgring 1000 km Silverstone 1000 km Spa 1000 km Suzuka 1000 km Zeltweg Geographical[edit] 1.010 Mm – Distance from San Diego to El Paso as the crow flies 2.000 Mm – Distance from Beijing to Hong Kong as the crow flies 2.800 Mm – Narrowest width of Atlantic Ocean (Brazil-West Africa) 2.850 Mm – Length of the Danube river 2.205 Mm – Length of Sweden's total land boundaries 2.515 Mm – Length of Norway's total land boundaries 3.690 Mm – Length of the Volga river, longest in Europe 4.350 Mm – Length of the Yellow River 4.800 Mm – Widest width of Atlantic Ocean (U.S.-Northern Africa) 5.100 Mm – Distance from Dublin to New York as the crow flies 6.270 Mm – Length of the Mississippi-Missouri River system 6.380 Mm – Length of the Yangtze River 6.400 Mm – Length of the Amazon River 6.758 Mm – Length of the Nile system, longest on Earth 8.200 Mm – Distance from Dublin to San Francisco as the crow flies Astronomical[edit] 1.000 Mm – Estimated shortest axis of triaxial dwarf planet Haumea 1.186 Mm – Diameter of Charon, the largest moon of Pluto 1.280 Mm – Diameter of the trans-Neptunian object 50000 Quaoar 1.436 Mm – Diameter of Iapetus, one of Saturn's major moons 1.578 Mm – Diameter of Titania, the largest of Uranus' moons 1.960 Mm – Estimated longest axis of Haumea 2.326 Mm – Diameter of the dwarf planet Eris, the largest trans-Neptunian object found to date 2.374 Mm – Diameter of Pluto 2.707 Mm – Diameter of Triton, largest moon of Neptune 3.122 Mm – Diameter of Europa, the smallest Galilean satellite of Jupiter 3.476 Mm – Diameter of Earth's Moon 3.643 Mm – Diameter of Io, a moon of Jupiter 4.821 Mm – Diameter of Callisto, a moon of Jupiter 4.879 Mm – Diameter of Mercury 5.150 Mm – Diameter of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn 5.262 Mm – Diameter of Jupiter's moon Ganymede, the largest moon in the solar system 6.366 Mm – Radius of Earth 6.792 Mm – Diameter of Mars


10 megametres[edit] Planets from Venus up to Uranus have diameters from ten to one hundred million metres. Top row: Uranus (left), Neptune (right); middle row: Earth (left), Sirius B (center), and Venus (right), to scale. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2007) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists lengths starting at 107 metres (10 megametres or 10,000 kilometres). Conversions[edit] 10 megametres (10 Mm) is 6,215 miles. side of a square of area 100,000,000 square kilometres (km2) radius of a circle of area 314,159,265 km2 Human-defined scales and structures[edit] 11.085 Mm – Length of the Kiev-Vladivostok railway, a longer variant of the Trans-Siberian railway[122] 13.300 Mm – Length of roads being rehabilitated and widened under the National Highway Development Project (launched in 1998) in India 39.000 Mm – Length of the SEA-ME-WE 3 optical submarine telecommunications cable, joining 39 points between Norden, Germany and Okinawa, Japan 67.000 Mm – Total length of National Highways in India Geographical[edit] 10 Mm – Approximate altitude of the outer boundary of the exosphere 10.001 Mm – Length of the meridian arc from the North Pole to the Equator (the original definition of the metre was based on this length). 60.000 Mm – Total length of the mid-ocean ridges Astronomical[edit] 12.000 Mm – Diameter of Sirius B, a white dwarf[123] 12.104 Mm – Diameter of Venus 12.742 Mm – Diameter of Earth 12.900 Mm – Minimum distance of the meteoroid 2004 FU162 from the center of Earth on 31 March 2004, closest on record 14.000 Mm – Smallest diameter of Jupiter's Great Red Spot 19.000 Mm – Separation between Pluto and Charon 34.770 Mm – Minimum distance of the asteroid 99942 Apophis on 13 April 2029 from the center of Earth 35.786 Mm – Altitude of geostationary orbit 40.005 Mm – Polar circumference of the Earth 40.077 Mm – Equatorial circumference of the Earth 49.528 Mm – Diameter of Neptune 51.118 Mm – Diameter of Uranus


100 megametres[edit] The Earth-Moon orbit, Saturn, OGLE-TR-122b, Jupiter, and other objects, to scale. Click on image for detailed view and links to other length scales. To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists lengths starting at 108 metres (100 megametres or 100,000 kilometres or 62,150 miles). 102 Mm – Diameter of HD 149026 b, an unusually dense Jovian planet 111.191 Mm – 20,000 (nautical, British) leagues (see Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea) 115 Mm – Width of Saturn's Rings 174 Mm – Diameter of 2MASS J0528-1403, the smallest known star 120 Mm – Diameter of Saturn 142 Mm – Diameter of Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system 170 Mm – Diameter of TRAPPIST-1, a star recently discovered to have 7 planets around it 174 Mm – Diameter of OGLE-TR-122b 180 Mm – Average distance covered during life 196 Mm – Diameter of Proxima Centauri, a typical red dwarf 242 Mm – Diameter of WASP-12b 250 Mm – Diameter of TrES-4 299.792 Mm – One light second; the distance light travels in vacuum in one second (see speed of light) 300 Mm – Diameter of WASP-17b 307 Mm – Diameter of CT Cha b 384.4 Mm (238,855 mi) – Average Earth-Moon distance[124] 671 Mm – Separation between Jupiter and Europa 964 Mm – Diameter of HD 100546 b, the largest known planet


1 gigametre[edit] Upper part: Gamma Orionis, Algol B, the Sun (centre), underneath their darker mirror images (artist's interpretation), and other objects, to scale. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 109 metres (1 gigametre (Gm) or 1 billion metres). 1.2 Gm – Separation between Saturn and Titan 1.39 Gm – Diameter of Sun[125] 1.5 Gm – (proposed) Expected orbit from Earth of the James Webb Space Telescope 2.19 Gm – Closest approach of Comet Lexell to Earth, happened on 1 July 1770; closest comet approach on record 3 Gm – Total length of "wiring" in the human brain.[126] 4.2 Gm – Diameter of Algol B 5.0 Gm – Closest approach of Comet Halley to Earth, happened on 10 April 837 5.0 Gm – (proposed) Size of the arms of the giant triangle shaped Michelson interferometer of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) planned to start observations in or around 2015. 7.9 Gm – Diameter of Gamma Orionis 9.0 Gm – Estimated diameter of the event horizon of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way galaxy


10 gigametres[edit] Rigel and Aldebaran (top left and right) compared to smaller stars, the Sun (very small dot in lower middle, with orbit of Mercury as yellow ellipse) and transparent sphere with radius of one light minute. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 1010 metres (10 gigametres (Gm) or 10 million kilometres, or 0.07 Astronomical units). 15 Gm – Closest distance of Comet Hyakutake from Earth 18 Gm – One light-minute (see yellow sphere in right-hand diagram) 24 Gm – Radius of a heliostationary orbit 46 Gm – Perihelion distance of Mercury (yellow ellipse on the right) 55 Gm – 60,000-year perigee of Mars (last achieved on 27 August 2003) 55 Gm - Radius of Rigel, a blue supergiant star (largest star on right)[127] 58 Gm – Average passing distance between Earth and Mars at the moment they overtake each other in their orbits 61 Gm[128][129] – Diameter of Aldebaran, an orange giant star (large star on right) 70 Gm – Aphelion distance of Mercury 76 Gm – Neso's apocentric distance; greatest distance of a natural satellite from its parent planet (Neptune)


100 gigametres[edit] From largest to smallest: Jupiter's orbit, red supergiant star Betelgeuse, Mars' orbit, Earth's orbit, star R Doradus, and orbits of Venus, Mercury. Inside R Doradus' depiction are the blue giant star Rigel and red giant star Aldebaran. The faint yellow glow around the Sun represents one light minute. Click image to see more details and links to their scales. To help compare distances at different orders of magnitude this section lists lengths starting at 1011 metres (100 Gm or 100 million kilometres or 0.7 astronomical units). 109 Gm – 0.7 AU – Distance between Venus and the Sun 149.6 Gm (93.0 million mi) – 1.0 AU – Distance between the Earth and the Sun - the definition of the astronomical unit 180 Gm – 1.2 AU – Maximum diameter of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole in the center of Milky Way galaxy 228 Gm – 1.5 AU – Distance between Mars and the Sun 570 Gm – 3.8 AU – Length of the tail of Comet Hyakutake measured by Ulysses; the actual value could be much higher 591 Gm – 4.0 AU – Minimum distance between the Earth and Jupiter 780 Gm – 5.2 AU – Distance between Jupiter and the Sun 965 Gm – 6.4 AU – Maximum distance between the Earth and Jupiter


1 terametre[edit] 8 things in the Terameter group Comparison of size of the Kuiper belt (large faint torus) with the star VY Canis Majoris (at its previous estimate, within Saturn's orbit), Betelgeuse (inside Jupiter's orbit) and R Doradus (small central red sphere) together with the orbits of Neptune and Uranus, to scale. The yellow ellipses represent the orbits of each planet and the dwarf planet Pluto. To help compare different distances, this section lists lengths starting at 1012 m (1 Tm or 1 billion km or 6.7 astronomical units). 1.079 Tm – 7.2 AU – One light-hour 1.23 Tm – 8.2 AU – Diameter of Antares 1.4 Tm – 9.5 AU – Distance between Saturn and the Sun 1.98 Tm – 13.2 AU – Revised estimated diameter of VY Canis Majoris. The newly improved measurement was 30% lower than the previous 2007 estimate.[130] 2.0 Tm – 13.4 AU – Diameter of one of the largest known stars, KY Cygni 2.4 Tm – 15.9 AU – Estimated diameter of UY Scuti, the largest known star as of 2013 2.9 Tm – 19.4 AU – Previous estimated diameter of VY Canis Majoris, as of 2007.[131] The size was revised in 2012 through improved measurement techniques. (see above)[130] 2.9 Tm – 19.4 AU – Distance between Uranus and the Sun 4.4 Tm – 29.4 AU – Perihelion distance of Pluto 4.5 Tm – 30.1 AU – Distance between Neptune and the Sun 4.5 Tm – 30.1 AU – Inner radius of the Kuiper belt 5.7 Tm – 38.1 AU – Perihelion distance of Eris 7.3 Tm – 48.8 AU – Aphelion distance of Pluto 7.5 Tm – 50.1 AU – Outer radius of the Kuiper Belt, inner boundary of the Oort Cloud


10 terametres[edit] Sedna's orbit (left) is longer than 100 Tm, but other lengths are between 10 and 100 Tm: Comet Hale-Bopp's orbit (lower, faint orange); one light-day (yellow spherical shell with yellow Vernal point arrow as radius); the heliosphere's termination shock (blue shell); and other arrows show positions of Voyager 1 (red) and Pioneer 10 (green). Click on image for larger view and links to other scales. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 1013 m (10 Tm or 10 billion km or 67 astronomical units). 11.1 Tm – 74.2 AU – Distance that Voyager 1 began detecting returning particles from termination shock 11.4 Tm – 76.2 AU – Perihelion distance of 90377 Sedna 12.1 Tm – 70 to 90 AU – Distance to termination shock (Voyager 1 crossed at 94 AU) 12.9 Tm – 86.3 AU – Distance to 90377 Sedna in March 2014 13.2 Tm – 88.6 AU – Distance to Pioneer 11 in March 2014 14.1 Tm – 94.3 AU – Estimated radius of the solar system 14.4 Tm – 96.4 AU – Distance to Eris in March 2014 (now near its aphelion) 15.1 Tm – 101 AU – Distance to heliosheath 16.5 Tm – 111 AU – Distance to Pioneer 10 as of March 2014 16.6 Tm - 111.2AU - Distance to Voyager 2 as of May 2016 20.0 Tm - 135 AU - Distance to Voyager 1 as of May 2016 20.6 Tm – 138 AU - Distance to Voyager 1 as of late February 2017 21.1 Tm – 138 AU - Distance to Voyager 1 as of November 2017 25.9 Tm – 172 AU – One light-day 55.7 Tm – 371 AU – Aphelion distance of the comet Hale-Bopp


100 terametres[edit] The largest yellow sphere indicates one light month distance from the Sun. Click the image for larger view, more details and links to other scales. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 1014 m (100 Tm or 100,000 million km or 670 astronomical units). 146 Tm – 975 AU – Aphelion distance of 90377 Sedna 172 Tm – 1150 AU – Schwarzschild diameter of H1821+643, one of the most massive black holes known 181 Tm – 1210 AU – One light-week 653 Tm – 4367 AU – Aphelion distance of comet Hyakutake (current orbit)[132] 757 Tm – 5059 AU – radius of the Stingray Nebula[133] 777 Tm – 5180 AU – One light-month


1 petametre[edit] Largest circle with yellow arrow indicates one light year from Sun; Cat's Eye Nebula on left and Barnard 68 in middle are depicted in front of Comet 1910 A1's orbit. Click image for larger view, details and links to other scales. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 1015 m (1 Pm or 1,000,000 million km or 6685 astronomical units (AU) or 0.11 light years). 1.0 Pm = 0.105702341 light years [134] 1.9 Pm ± .5 Pm = 12,000 AU = 0.2 light year radius of Cat's Eye Nebula's inner core[135] 4.7 Pm = 30,000 AU = half light year diameter of Bok globule Barnard 68[136] 7.5 Pm – 50,000 AU – Possible outer boundary of Oort cloud (other estimates are 75,000 to 125,000 or even 189,000 AU (1.6, 2, and 3 light years, respectively)) 7.7 Pm – 52,000 AU – Aphelion distance of the Great Daylight Comet of 1910 9.5 Pm – 63,241.1 AU – One light year, the distance travelled by light in one year


10 petametres[edit] Objects with size order of magnitude 1e16m: Ten light years (94.6 Pm) radius circle with yellow Vernal Point arrow; Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635), left; Dumbbell Nebula (NGC 6853), right; one light year shell lower right with the smaller Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC_6543) and Barnard 68 adjacent. 1e16m lengths: Ten light years (94.6 Pm) yellow shell; Sirius below right; BL Ceti below left; Proxima and Alpha Centauri upper right; light year shell with Comet 1910 A1's orbit inside top right To help compare different distances this section lists lengths starting at 1016 m (10 Pm or 66,800 AU, 1.06 light years). 15 Pm – 1.59 light years – Possible outer radius of Oort cloud 20 Pm – 2.11 light years – maximum extent of influence of the Sun's gravitational field[citation needed] 30.9 Pm – 3.26 light years – 1 parsec 39.9 Pm – 4.22 light years – Distance to Proxima Centauri (nearest star to Sun) 81.3 Pm – 8.59 light years – Distance to Sirius


100 petametres[edit] Lengths with order of magnitude 1e17m: yellow Vernal Point arrow traces hundred light year radius circle with smaller ten light year circle at right; globular cluster Messier 5 in background; 12 light year radius Orion Nebula middle right; 50 light year wide view of the Carina Nebula bottom left; Pleiades cluster and Bubble nebula with similar diameters each around 10 light years bottom right; grey arrows show distances from Sun to stars Aldebaran (65 light years) and Vega (25 light years). This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it. To help compare different distances this section lists lengths between 1017 m (100 Pm or 11 light years) and 1018 m (106 light years). 110 Pm – 12 light years – Distance to Tau Ceti 230 Pm – 24 light years – Diameter of the Orion Nebula[137][138] 240 Pm – 25 light years – Distance to Vega 260 Pm – 27 light years – Distance to Chara, a star approximately as bright as our Sun. Its faintness gives us an idea how our Sun would appear when viewed from even so close a distance as this. 350 Pm – 37 light years – Distance to Arcturus 373.1 Pm – 39.44 light years - Distance to TRAPPIST-1, a star recently discovered to have 7 planets around it. 400 Pm – 42 light years – Distance to Capella 620 Pm – 65 light years – Distance to Aldebaran 750 Pm - 79.36 light years - Distance to Regulus 900 Pm - 92.73 light years - Distance to Algol


1 exametre[edit] Lengths with order of magnitude 1e18m: thousand light year radius circle with yellow arrow and 100 light year circle at right with globular cluster Messier 5 within and Carina Nebula in front; globular cluster Omega Centauri to left of both; part of the 1400 light year wide Tarantula Nebula fills the background. This list includes distances between 1 and 10 exametres (1018 m). To help compare different distances this section lists lengths between 1018 m (1 Em or 105.7 light years) and 1019 m (1057 light years). 1.2 Em – 129 light years – Diameter of Messier 13 (a typical globular cluster) 1.6 Em – 172 ± 12.5 light years – Diameter of Omega Centauri (one of the largest known globular clusters, perhaps containing over a million stars)[139][140] 3.1 Em – 310 light years – Distance to Canopus according to Hipparcos[141] 5.7 Em – 600 light years – Diameter of the Tarantula Nebula[citation needed] 6.1 Em – 640 light years – Distance to Betelgeuse according to Hipparcos[142] 6.2 Em – 650 light years – Distance to the Helix Nebula, located in the constellation Aquarius[143] 7.3 Em – 730 light years – Distance to Rigel according to Hipparcos[141]


10 exametres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 10 Em (1019 m or 1,100 light years). 13 Em – 1,300 light years – Distance to the Orion Nebula[144] 14 Em – 1,500 light years – Approximate thickness of the plane of the Milky Way galaxy at the Sun's location 14.2 Em – 1,520 light years – Diameter of the NGC 604 30.8568 Em – 3,261.6 light years – 1 kiloparsec 31 Em – 3,200 light years – Distance to Deneb according to Hipparcos 46 Em – 4,900 light years – Distance to OGLE-TR-56, the first extrasolar planet discovered using the transit method 47 Em – 5,000 light years – Distance to the Boomerang nebula, coldest place known (1 K) 53 Em – 5,600 light years – Distance to the globular cluster M4 and the extrasolar planet PSR B1620-26 b within it 61 Em – 6,500 light years – Distance to Perseus Spiral Arm (next spiral arm out in the Milky Way galaxy) 71 Em – 7,500 light years – Distance to Eta Carinae


100 exametres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 100 Em (1020 m or 11,000 light years). 150 Em – 16,000 light years – Diameter of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy orbiting the Milky Way 200 Em – 21,500 light years – Distance to OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, the most distant and the most Earth-like planet known 240 Em – 25,000 light years – Distance to the Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy 260 Em – 28,000 light years – Distance to the center of the Galaxy 830 Em – 88,000 light years – Distance to the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy >950 Em – >100,000 light years – Diameter of the disc of the Milky Way Galaxy


1 zettametre[edit] The zettametre (SI symbol: Zm) is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1021 metres.[145] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 1 Zm (1021 m or 110,000 light years). 1.7 Zm – 179,000 light years – Distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud, largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way 2.0 Zm – 210,000 light years – Distance to the Small Magellanic Cloud 2.8 Zm – 300,000 light years – Distance to the Intergalactic Wanderer, one of the most distant globular clusters of Milky Way 8.5 Zm – 900,000 light years – Distance to the Leo I Dwarf Galaxy, farthest known Milky Way satellite galaxy


10 zettametres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 10 Zm (1022 m or 1.1 million light years). 24 Zm – 2.5 million light years – Distance to the Andromeda Galaxy[146] 30.8568 Zm – 3.2616 million light years – 1 megaparsec 40 Zm – 4.2 million light years – Distance to the IC 10, a distant member of the Local Group of galaxies 49.2 Zm – 5.2 million light years – Width of the Local Group of galaxies 57 Zm – 6 million light years – Diameter of the supergiant elliptical galaxy IC 1101 95 Zm – 10 million light years – Distance to the Sculptor Galaxy in the Sculptor Group of galaxies 95 Zm – 10 million light years – Distance to the Maffei 1, the nearest giant elliptical galaxy in the Maffei 1 Group


100 zettametres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 100 Zm (1023 m or 11 million light years). 140 Zm – 15 million light years – Distance to Centaurus A galaxy 250 Zm – 27 million light years – Distance to the Pinwheel Galaxy 280 Zm – 30 million light years – Distance to the Sombrero Galaxy 570 Zm – 60 million light years – Approximate distance to the Virgo cluster, nearest galaxy cluster 620 Zm – 65 million light years – Approximate distance to the Fornax cluster 800 Zm – 85 million light years – Approximate distance to the Eridanus cluster


1 yottametre[edit] The yottametre or yottameter in the US ( SI symbol: Ym) is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1024 metres[145] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 1 Ym (1024 m or 105.702 million light years). 1.2 Ym – 127 million light years – Distance to the closest observed gamma ray burst GRB 980425 1.3 Ym – 137 million light years – Distance to the Centaurus Cluster of galaxies, the nearest large supercluster 1.9 Ym – 201 million light years – Diameter of the Local Supercluster 2.3 Ym – 225 to 250 million light years – Distance light travels in vacuum in one galactic year 2.8 Ym – 296 million light years – Distance to the Coma Cluster 3.2 Ym – 338 million light years – Distance to the Stephan's Quintet 4.7 Ym – 496 million light years – Length of the CfA2 Great Wall, one of the largest observed superstructures in the Universe 6.1 Ym – 645 million light years – Distance to the Shapley Supercluster 9.5 Ym – 996 million light years – Diameter of the Eridanus Supervoid


10 yottametres[edit] The universe within 1 billion light years of Earth To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 10 Ym (1025 m or 1.1 billion light-years). At this scale, expansion of the universe becomes significant. Distance of these objects are derived from their measured redshifts, which depends on the cosmological models used. 13.7 Ym – 1.37 billion light-years – Length of the Sloan Great Wall 18 Ym – redshift 0.16 – 1.9 billion light-years – Distance to the quasar 3C 273 (light travel distance) 33 Ym – 3.5 billion light-years – Maximum distance of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (light travel distance) 37.8 Ym – 4 billion light-years – Length of the Huge-LQG 75 Ym – redshift 0.95 – 8 billion light-years – Approximate distance to the supernova SN 2002dd in the Hubble Deep Field North (light travel distance) 85 Ym – redshift 1.6 – 9 billion light-years – Approximate distance to the gamma ray burst GRB 990123 (light travel distance) 94.6 Ym – 10 billion light-years – Approximate distance to quasar OQ172 94.6 Ym – 10 billion light-years – Length of the Hercules-Corona Borealis Great Wall, one of the largest and most massive known cosmic structure.


100 yottametres[edit] To help compare different orders of magnitude, this section lists distances starting at 100 Ym (1026 m or 11 billion light years). At this scale, expansion of the universe becomes significant. Distance of these objects are derived from their measured redshifts, which depend on the cosmological models used. Distances longer than 100 Ym 130 Ym – redshift 6.41 – 13 billion light years – Light travel distance (LTD) to the quasar SDSS J1148+5251 130 Ym – redshift 1000 – 13.8 billion light years – Distance (LTD) to the source of the cosmic microwave background radiation; radius of the observable universe measured as a LTD 260 Ym – 27.4 billion light years – Diameter of the observable universe (double LTD) 440 Ym – 46 billion light years – Radius of the universe measured as a comoving distance. 590 Ym – 62 billion light years – Cosmological event horizon: the largest comoving distance from which light will ever reach us (the observer) at any time in the future 886.48 Ym – 93.7 billion light years – The diameter of the observable universe; however, there might be unobserved distances that are even greater. >1,000 Ym (1 kYm or xennameter in older usage) – Size of universe beyond the cosmic light horizon, depending on its curvature; if the curvature is zero (i.e. the universe is spatially flat), the value can be infinite (see shape of the universe) as previously mentioned


Notes[edit] ^ According to The Physics Factbook, the diameter of human hair ranges from 17 to 181 μm. Ley, Brian (1999). "Width of a Human Hair". The Physics Factbook.  ^ a b The exact category (asteroid, dwarf planet or planet) to which particular Solar System objects belong, has been subject to some revision since the discovery of extrasolar planets and trans-Neptunian objects ^ a b 10115 is 1 followed by 115 zeroes, or a googol multiplied by a quadrillion. 1010115 is 1 followed by a quadrillion googol zeroes. 101010122is 1 followed by 1010122 (a googolplex10 sextillion) zeroes.


See also[edit] List of examples of lengths


References[edit] ^ a b c d e f Cliff Burgess; Fernando Quevedo (November 2007). "The Great Cosmic Roller-Coaster Ride". Scientific American (print). Scientific American, Inc. p. 55. Retrieved 2017-05-01.  ^ Carl R. Nave. "Cowan and Reines Neutrino Experiment". Retrieved 2008-12-04.  (6.3 × 10−44 cm2, which gives an effective radius of about 2 × 10−23 m) ^ Carl R. Nave. "Neutron Absorption Cross-sections". Retrieved 2008-12-04.  (area for 20 GeV about 10 × 10−42 m2 gives effective radius of about 2 × 10−21 m; for 250 GeV about 150 × 10−42 m2 gives effective radius of about 7 × 10−21 m) ^ gravitational waves that originate tens of millions of light years from Earth are expected to distort the 4 kilometre mirror spacing by about 10−18 m, less than one-thousandth the charge diameter of a proton. Equivalently, this is a relative change in distance of approximately one part in 1021. "On 14 September 2015 at 09:50:45 UTC the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory simultaneously observed a transient gravitational-wave signal. The signal sweeps upwards in frequency from 35 to 250 Hz with a peak gravitational-wave strain of 1.0×10−21." B. P. Abbott et al. (LIGO Scientific Collaboration and Virgo Collaboration), "Observation of Gravitational Waves from a Binary Black Hole Merger", Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 061102, published 11 February 2016. ^ Randolf Pohl; Aldo Antognini; François Nez; Fernando D. Amaro; François Biraben; João M. R. Cardoso; Daniel S. Covita; Andreas Dax; Satish Dhawan; Luis M. P. Fernandes; Adolf Giesen; Thomas Graf; Theodor W. Hänsch; Paul Indelicato; Lucile Julien; Cheng-Yang Kao; Paul Knowles; Eric-Olivier Le Bigot; Yi-Wei Liu; José A. M. Lopes; Livia Ludhova; Cristina M. B. Monteiro; Françoise Mulhauser; Tobias Nebel; Paul Rabinowitz; et al. (8 July 2010). "The size of the proton". Nature. 466 (7303): 213–216. Bibcode:2010Natur.466..213P. doi:10.1038/nature09250. PMID 20613837. Retrieved 2010-07-09.  ^ Carl R. Nave. "Scattering Cross Section". Retrieved 10 February 2009.  (diameter of the Scattering Cross Section of an 11 MeV proton with a target proton) ^ NIST. CODATA Value: classical electron radius. Retrieved 10 February 2009. ^ H. E. Smith. "The Scale of the Universe". UCSD. Retrieved 10 February 2009. ~10−13cm  ^ Mark Winter (2008). "WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements / Sulfur / Radii". Retrieved 2008-12-06.  ^ Flahaut, E.; Bacsa R; Peigney A; Laurent C. (2003). "Gram-Scale CCVD Synthesis of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes". Chemical Communications. 12 (12): 1442–1443. doi:10.1039/b301514a. PMID 12841282. Retrieved 2008-11-14.  ^ Stewart, Robert. "Dr". Radiobiology Software. Archived from the original on 2010-06-30. Retrieved 2015-05-20.  ^ Dominique Langevin. "Chapter 10: DNA-Surfactant/Lipid Complexes at Liquid Interfaces". In Rita S Dias and Bjorn Lindman. DNA Interactions with Polymers and Surfactants. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. p. 265. ISBN 978-0-470-25818-7. Retrieved 24 May 2014. DNA has 20 elementary charges per helical turn over the corresponding length of 3.4nm [dead link] ^ [1] ^ "Hard drive basics – Capacities, RPM speeds, interfaces and mechanics". helpwithpcs.com. Retrieved 13 July 2016.  ^ Cohn, J. University of California, Berkeley Lyman alpha systems and cosmology. Retrieved 21 February 2009. ^ Seth, S.D.; Seth, Vimlesh (2009). Textbook of Pharmacology (3rd ed.). Elsevier. p. X111. ISBN 978-81-312-1158-8. Retrieved 19 July 2016.  ^ Color ^ "Size of bacteria". What are bacteria?. Retrieved 19 July 2016.  ^ "Engineering properties of spider silk" (PDF). web.mit.edu. Retrieved 19 July 2016.  ^ Doohan, Jim. "Blood cells". biosbcc.net. Archived from the original on 23 July 2016. Retrieved 19 July 2016.  ^ a b c d According to The Physics Factbook, the diameter of human hair ranges from 17 to 181 µm. Ley, Brian (1999). "Width of a Human Hair". The Physics Factbook.  ^ Liu, Z; Huang, AJ; Pflugfelder, SC (July 1999). "Evaluation of corneal thickness and topography in normal eyes using the Orbscan corneal topography system". Br J Ophthalmol. 83 (7): 774–8. doi:10.1136/bjo.83.7.774. PMC 1723104 . PMID 10381661.  ^ a b Order Siphonaptera – Fleas – BugGuide.Net Accessed 29 April 2014 ^ a b "Official Rules". MLB. Retrieved 2011-09-30.  ^ a b "What is a rapier - Renaissance swords Rapiers". 2-Clicks Swords.  ^ Bohun B. Kinloch, Jr. and William H. Scheuner. "Pinus lambertiana". Retrieved 19 January 2017. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) ^ a b "Tallest Man". Guinness World Records. Archived from the original on 2011-06-05. Retrieved 2010-06-10.  ^ "Animal Records". Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Retrieved 2007-05-29.  ^ a b "Niagara Falls Geology Facts & Figures". Niagara Parks Commission. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 29 June 2011.  ^ a b "Three Gorges Dam". encyclopedia.com. Cengage Learning.  ^ Thomas, P. C.; Parker, J. Wm.; McFadden, L. A.; et al. (2005). "Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape". Nature. 437 (7056): 224–226. Bibcode:2005Natur.437..224T. doi:10.1038/nature03938. PMID 16148926.  ^ Spacecraft escaping the Solar System Archived 9 March 2011 at WebCite ^ Twin Keck telescopes probe dual dust disks ^ "medical science - Length of uncoiled human DNA - Skeptics Stack Exchange". Retrieved 13 March 2015.  ^ Shiga, David. "Sun's 'twin' an ideal hunting ground for alien life". New Scientist. Retrieved 2007-10-03.  ^ Christian, Eric; Samar, Safi-Harb. "How large is the Milky Way?". Retrieved 2008-11-14.  ^ Duncan, Martin (2008). "16". Physics 216 – Introduction to Astrophysics (PDF). Retrieved 2008-11-14.  ^ "Milky Way fatter than first thought". The Sydney Morning Herald. Australian Associated Press. 20 February 2008. Archived from the original on 28 April 2008. Retrieved 14 November 2008.  ^ http://www.atlasoftheuniverse.com/superc/hor.html The Horologium Supercluster ^ J. R. Gott III et al., Astrophys. J., 624, 463 (2005). Figure 8 – "Logarithmic Maps of the Universe" – is available as a poster from the homepage of Mario Juric. Archived 24 January 2009 at the Wayback Machine. ^ http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0605709v2 How Many Universes Do There Need To Be? ^ "Parallel universes. Not just a staple of science fiction, other universes are a direct implication of cosmological observations.", Tegmark M., Sci Am. 2003 May;288(5):40-51. ^ Max Tegmark (2003). "Parallel Universes". In "Science and Ultimate Reality: from Quantum to Cosmos", honoring John Wheeler's 90th birthday. J. D. Barrow, P.C.W. Davies, & C.L. Harper eds. Cambridge University Press (2003). 288: 40–51. arXiv:astro-ph/0302131 . Bibcode:2003astro.ph..2131T. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0503-40. PMID 12701329.  ^ http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0610199 "Susskind's Challenge to the Hartle-Hawking No-Boundary Proposal and Possible Resolutions " ^ Annis, Patty J. October 1991. Kansas State University. Fine Particle POLLUTION. Figure 1. (tobacco smoke: 10 to 6994100000000000000♠1000 nm; virus particles: 3 to 50 nm; bacteria: 30 to 6995300000000000000♠30000 nm; cooking oil smoke: 30 to 6995300000000000000♠30000 nm; wood smoke: 7 to 6994300000000000000♠3000 nm) ^ Stryer, Lubert (1988). Biochemistry. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman. ISBN 0-7167-1843-X.  ^ Microbiology Text.com ^ http://www.physorg.com/news172852816.html accessed 2009.09.21 ^ help with PCs web site ^ Graham T. Smith (2002). Industrial metrology. Springer. p. 253. ISBN 978-1-85233-507-6.  ^ Electrospray versus Nebulization for Aerosolization and Filter Testing with Bacteriophage Particles. In-Depth Article. Retrieved 15 September 2010. Aerosol Science and Technology, Volume 43, Issue 4 April 2009, pages 298 - 304. ^ Textbook Of Pharmacology by SD Seth ^ Walker K, Skelton H, Smith K (2002). "Cutaneous lesions showing giant yeast forms of Blastomyces dermatitidis". Journal of Cutaneous Pathology. 29 (10): 616–618. doi:10.1034/j.1600-0560.2002.291009.x. PMID 12453301.  ^ Smith, D.J. (2009). "Human sperm accumulation near surfaces: a simulation study" (PDF). Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 621: 295. Bibcode:2009JFM...621..289S. doi:10.1017/S0022112008004953. Retrieved 20 May 2012.  ^ DNA From The Beginning, section 6: Genes are real things., "Amination" section, final slide ^ Gordon Ramel. "Spider Silk". Archived from the original on 4 December 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-04. garden spider silk has a diameter of about 0.003 mm ... Dragline silk (about .00032 inch (.008 mm) in Nephila)  ^ a b IST - Innovative Sintering Technologies Ltd. "Fibreshape applications". Retrieved 2008-12-04. Histogram of cotton thickness  ^ Morton Lippmann (2000). Environmental Toxicants: Human Exposures and Their Health Effects. John Wiley and Sons. p. 453. ISBN 0-471-29298-2. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 20 µm .. 5 µm  ^ a b "La Loi Du 18 Germinal An 3 - Décision de tracer le mètre, unité fondamentale, sur une règle de platine. Nomenclature des "mesures républicaines". Reprise de la triangulation" (in French). histoire.du.metre.free.fr. Retrieved 2015-10-12.  ^ a b Comité International des Poids et Mesures (1935). "Procès-Verbaux des Séances" (in French). 17 (2 ed.). Paris, France: Gauthier-Villars, imprimeur-libraire du Bureau des Longitudes, de l'École Polytechnique: 76.  ^ a b Roberts, Richard W. (1975-06-01). Metric System of Weights and Measures - Guidelines for Use. USA: Director of the National Bureau of Standards. Federal Register FR Doc.75-15798 (1975-06-18). Accordingly, the following units and terms listed in the table of metric units in section 2 of the act of 28 July 1866, that legalized the metric system of weights and measures in the United States, are no longer accepted for use in the United States: myriameter, stere, millier or tonneau, quintal, myriagram, kilo (for kilogram).  ^ a b Judson, Lewis V. (1976-10-01) [1963]. "Appendix 7". In Barbrow, Louis E. Weights and Measures Standards of the United States, a brief history (PDF). Derived from a prior work by Louis A. Fisher (1905). USA: US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards. p. 33. LCCN 76-600055. NBS Special Publication 447; NIST SP 447; 003-003-01654-3. Retrieved 2015-10-12.  ^ Kim Popiolek. "Dr. Charles Lindemann's Lab: Sperm Facts". Oakland University.  ^ Santoso, Alex (17 June 2006). "World's Biggest Sperm Belongs to a Tiny Fly". Neatorama.  ^ House Dust Mites HYG-2157-97. Retrieved 2008-12-04 ^ "Evaluation of corneal thickness and topography in normal eyes using the Orbscan corneal topography system". Br J Ophthalmol. 83 (7): 774–8. July 1999. doi:10.1136/bjo.83.7.774. PMC 1723104 . PMID 10381661.  ^ "CNN - Scientists discover biggest bacteria ever - April 15, 1999". www.cnn.com. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ "World's Smallest Frog Found—Fly-Size Beast Is Tiniest Vertebrate". 2017-01-13. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ NATO Infantry Weapons Standardization, Per G. Arvidsson, ChairmanWeapons & Sensors Working GroupLand Capability Group 1 – Dismounted Soldier NATO Army Armaments Group Accessed 29 April 2014 ^ "World's smallest vertebrate has a big secret". New Scientist. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ "The Smallest Salamander". Mongabay.com. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ "Comparing quail eggs". BackYard Chickens. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ "USGA: Guide to the Rules on Clubs and Balls". USGA. Retrieved 2011-09-30.  ^ "Credit Card Dimensions". Retrieved 2011-09-30.  ^ Bohun B. Kinloch, Jr. & William H. Scheuner. "Pinus lambertiana". Archived from the original on 8 June 2011. Retrieved 2017-05-01.  ^ "HTwins.net - The Scale of the Universe". htwins.net. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ Laws of the Game (PDF), FIFA  ^ IAAF International Association of Athletics Federations - IAAF.org - Statistics - Top Lists, archived from the original on 16 January 2008, retrieved 9 April 2010  ^ IAAF International Association of Athletics Federations - IAAF.org - Past Results, archived from the original on 2011-06-04, retrieved 9 April 2010  ^ Dagg, A. I. (1971), Mammalian Species 5 (Giraffa camelopardalis ed.), pp. 1–8  ^ Plait, P. (2008-10-06). "Incoming!!!". Bad Astronomy. Archived from the original on 7 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-08.  ^ "Rule 1.04 The Playing Field" (PDF). Official Baseball Rules. Major League Baseball. 25 January 2010. pp. 1–5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 27 April 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2011.  See especially Diagram No. 1, page 3. ^ "Law 7 (The pitch)". Laws of Cricket. Marylebone Cricket Club. October 2010. Archived from the original on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 1 April 2011.  ^ "Animal Records". Smithsonian National Zoological Park. Archived from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 29 May 2007.  ^ Highways Agency. "Driver Location Signs - Frequently Asked Questions". Archived from the original on 10 August 2012. Retrieved 10 February 2010.  ^ "Kingda Ka (Six Flags Great Adventure)". Archived from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 18 April 2009.  ^ "Tour Eiffel". Retrieved 15 September 2010.  ^ "Facts About the CN Tower". TripSavvy. Retrieved 2017-05-20.  ^ "Burj Dubai all set for 09/09/09 soft opening". Emirates Business 24-7. Archived from the original on 19 January 2009. Retrieved 17 January 2009.  ^ "Education & Technical - Referees - Laws of the Game". FIFA.com.  ^ "Tallest tree in the world: coast redwood". Monumental Trees, an inventory of big and old trees worldwide.  ^ Fujiwara, Akira; et al. (2 June 2006). "The Rubble-Pile Asteroid Itokawa as Observed by Hayabusa". Science. 312 (5778): 1330–1334. Bibcode:2006Sci...312.1330F. doi:10.1126/science.1125841. PMID 16741107. Archived from the original on 2 April 2009. Retrieved 20 April 2009.  ^ "long wave". Oxford Dictionaries. Retrieved 12 March 2011. wavelength above one kilometre (and a frequency below 300 kHz)  ^ "Golden Gate Bridge official website". Retrieved 10 June 2012.  ^ "nautical mile". Merriam Webster. Retrieved 12 March 2011.  ^ Akashi Kaikyo Bridge @ Everything2.com, Everything2, 2002-09-09, retrieved 19 April 2009  ^ Jeffrey Friedl (2008-12-09), Supporting the Longest Suspension Bridge in the World, archived from the original on 25 April 2009, retrieved 19 April 2009  ^ New height of world's railway born in Tibet, Xinhua News Agency, 24 August 2005, archived from the original on 25 April 2009, retrieved 19 April 2009  ^ "GeoNames".  ^ "Russians in landmark Baikal dive". BBC News. 29 July 2008. Retrieved 12 March 2011. current record of 1,637m was set in Lake Baikal in the 1990s  ^ "Kosciuszko National Park lookouts and scenery". Office of Environment & Heritage: NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service.  ^ "Carstensz Pyramid details". Carstensz Pyramid Site.  ^ Appell, Wolfgang (2009-09-16) [2002]. "Königreich Frankreich" [Kingdom of France]. Amtliche Maßeinheiten in Europa 1842 [Official units of measure in Europe 1842] (in German). Archived from the original on 2011-10-05. Retrieved 10 February 2011 (Website based on Alte Meß- und Währungssysteme aus dem deutschen Sprachgebiet, ISBN 3-7686-1036-5.)  ^ Brewster, David (1830). The Edinburgh Encyclopædia. 12. Edinburgh, UK: William Blackwood, John Waugh, John Murray, Baldwin & Cradock, J. M. Richardson. p. 494. Retrieved 2015-10-09.  ^ Brewster, David (1832). The Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. 12 (1st American ed.). Joseph and Edward Parker. Retrieved 2015-10-09.  ^ Dingler, Johann Gottfried (1823). Polytechnisches Journal (in German). 11. Stuttgart, Germany: J.W. Gotta'schen Buchhandlung. Retrieved 2015-10-09.  ^ Haugen, Einar, Norwegian English Dictionary, 1965, Oslo: Universitetsforlaget and Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, s.v. mil ^ https://sizes.com/units/farsakh.htm ^ "IAAF Competition Rules 2008" (pdf). IAAF. p. 195. Archived (PDF) from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 20 April 2009.  ^ Gregory Kennedy. "Stratolab, an Evolutionary Stratospheric Balloon Project".  ^ Wise, Jeff (1 October 2009). "Turkey Building the World's Deepest Immersed Tube Tunnel". Popular Mechanics. Retrieved 1 May 2017.  ^ http://panamacanalfacts.com/facts-about-the-panama-canal/ ^ Highest and lowest points on Mars NASA ^ Plescia, Jeff (1997-10-01). "Height of Martian vs. Earth mountains". Questions and Answers about Mars terrain and geology. Retrieved 2009-04-20.  ^ "High Speed 1 Project Hoem". www.betchel.com. Betchel Corporation. Retrieved 8 February 2015.  ^ "Bordeaux-Paris | the event". www.bordeauxparis.com. Retrieved 30 April 2017.  ^ Thomas, P. C.; Parker, J. Wm.; McFadden, L. A.; et al. (2005). "Differentiation of the asteroid Ceres as revealed by its shape". Nature. 437 (7056): 224–226. Bibcode:2005Natur.437..224T. doi:10.1038/nature03938. PMID 16148926.  ^ "FAQ-Alaska Highway Facts". The MILEPOST. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2007-08-25. 1,390 miles ... Alaska Route 2 and often treated as a natural extension of the Alaska Highway  ^ Downward, R.J.; Bromell, J.E. (March 1990). "The development of a policy for the management of dingo populations in South Australia". Proceedings of the Fourteenth Vertebrate Pest Conference 1990. University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Archived from the original on 4 September 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-31.  ^ "China's Great Wall far longer than thought: survey". AFP. 2009-04-20. Archived from the original on 27 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-20.  ^ CIS railway timetable, route No. 002, Moscow-Vladivostok. Archived 2009-12-03. ^ CIS railway timetable, route No. 350, Kiev-Vladivostok. Archived 2009-12-03. ^ McGourty, Christine (2005-12-14). "Hubble finds mass of white dwarf". BBC News. Retrieved 2007-10-13.  ^ NASA Staff (10 May 2011). "Solar System Exploration - Earth's Moon: Facts & Figures". NASA. Retrieved 2011-11-06.  ^ Sun Fact Sheet ^ Neuroscience: The Science of the Brain "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2 February 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-08.  p.44 ^ Moravveji, Ehsan; Guinan, Edward F; Shultz, Matt; Williamson, Michael H; Moya, Andres (4 January 2012). "Asteroseismology of the Nearby SN-II Progenitor: Rigel Part I. The MOST High Precision Photometry and Radial Velocity Monitoring". Astrophysical Journal: 2. arXiv:1201.0843 . Bibcode:2012ApJ...747..108M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/747/2/108. Retrieved 30 April 2017.  ^ Richichi, A.; Roccatagliata, V. Aldebaran's angular diameter: How well do we know it?. Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 433, Issue 1, 1 April 2005, pp.305-312. "We derive an average value of 19.96±0.03 milliarcsec for the uniform disk diameter. The corresponding limb-darkened value is 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, or 44.2±0.9 Rȯ." ^ Richichi, A. and Roccatagliata, V. derived an angular diameter of 20.58±0.03 milliarcsec, which given a distance of 65 light years yields a diameter of 61 million km ^ a b Wittkowski, M.; Hauschildt, P.H.; Arroyo-Torres, B.; Marcaide, J.M. (5 April 2012). "Fundamental properties and atmospheric structure of the red supergiant VY CMa based on VLTI/AMBER spectro-interferometry". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 540: L12. arXiv:1203.5194 . Bibcode:2012A&A...540L..12W. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201219126.  ^ Humphreys, Roberta (13 October 2006). "VY Canis Majoris: the astrophysical basis of its luminosity". arXiv:astro-ph/0610433 . Bibcode:2006astro.ph.10433H.  ^ "Comet Hyakutake: Orbital elements and 10-day ephemeris". European Space Agency. Retrieved 2008-12-07.  ^ Parthasarathy, M. (2000). "Birth and early evolution of planetary nebulae". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society of India. 28: 217–224. Bibcode:2000BASI...28..217P.  ^ "Google Conversion".  ^ radius = distance times sin(angular diameter/2) = 0.2 light year. Distance = 3.3 ± 0.9 kly; angular diameter = 20 arcseconds(Reed et al. 1999) ^ Michael Szpir (May–June 2001). "Bart Bok's Black Blobs". American Scientist. Archived from the original on 2003-06-29. Retrieved 2008-11-19. Bok globules such as Barnard 68 are only about half a light-year across and weigh in at about two solar masses  ^ Sandstrom, Karin M; Peek, J. E. G.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Plambeck, Richard L. (1999). "A Parallactic Distance of 7002389000000000000♠389+24 −21 parsecs to the Orion Nebula Cluster from Very Long Baseline Array Observations". The Astrophysical Journal. 667 (2): 1161–1169. arXiv:0706.2361 . Bibcode:2007ApJ...667.1161S. doi:10.1086/520922.  ^ diameter=sin(65 arcminutes)*1270 light years=24; where "65.00 x 60.0 (arcmin)" sourced from Revised NGC Data for NGC 1976 ^ distance × sin( diameter_angle ), using distance of 5kpc (15.8 ± 1.1 kly) and angle 36.3', = 172 ± 12.5 ly. ^ van de Ven, G.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Verolme, E. K.; de Zeeuw, P. T. (11 January 2006). "The dynamical distance and intrinsic structure of the globular cluster ω Centauri". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 445 (2): 513–543. arXiv:astro-ph/0509228 . Bibcode:2006A&A...445..513V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20053061. best-fit dynamical distance D=4.8±0.3 kpc ... consistent with the canonical value 5.0±0.2 kpc obtained by photometric methods  ^ a b van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752 . Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.  Vizier catalog entry ^ Harper, Graham M.; Brown, Alexander; Guinan, Edward F. (April 2008). "A New VLA-Hipparcos Distance to Betelgeuse and its Implications" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal. 135 (4): 1430–40. Bibcode:2008AJ....135.1430H. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/135/4/1430.  ^ Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; et al. (February 2007). "Trigonometric Parallaxes of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae". The Astronomical Journal. 133 (2): 631–638. arXiv:astro-ph/0611543 . Bibcode:2007AJ....133..631H. doi:10.1086/510348.  ^ Reid, M. J.; et al. (2009). "Trigonometric Parallaxes of Massive Star Forming Regions: VI. Galactic Structure, Fundamental Parameters and Non-Circular Motions". Astrophysical Journal. 700: 137–148. arXiv:0902.3913 . Bibcode:2009ApJ...700..137R. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/700/1/137.  ^ a b "SI Brochure: The International System of Units (SI)". International Committee for Weights and Measures. Organisation Intergouvernementale de la Convention du Mètre. Retrieved 11 October 2014.  ^ Local Group


External links[edit] How Big Are Things? displays orders of magnitude in successively larger rooms Powers of Ten Travel across the Universe. Altering perspective by changing scale by just a few powers of ten (interactive)[dead link] Cosmos – an Illustrated Dimensional Journey from microcosmos to macrocosmos – from Digital Nature Agency Scale of the universe- interactive guide to length magnitudes v t e Orders of magnitude Quantity Acceleration Angular velocity Area Bit rate Capacitance Charge Computing Currency Current Data Density Energy / Energy density / Energy flow density Entropy Force Frequency Inductance Illuminance Length Luminance / Luminous flux Magnetic field Mass Molarity Numbers Power Pressure Probability Radiation Resistance Sound pressure Specific energy Specific heat capacity Speed Temperature Time Viscosity Voltage Volume See also Back-of-the-envelope calculation Fermi problem Powers of 10 Metric (SI) prefix Macroscopic scale Microscopic scale Quantum realm Related Earth's location in the Universe Cosmic View (1957 essay) To the Moon and Beyond (1964 film) Cosmic Zoom (1968 film) Powers of Ten (1968 and 1977 films) Cosmic Voyage (1996 documentary) Cosmic Eye (2012) Book Category Science portal v t e Units of length used in Astronomy Astronomical system of units Earth radius (R⊕ or RE) Light-second (ls) Solar radius (R☉) gigametre (Gm) Astronomical unit (AU) terametre (Tm) light-year (ly) parsec (pc) kiloparsec (kpc) megaparsec (Mpc) gigaparsec (Gpc) See also Cosmic distance ladder Orders of magnitude (length) Conversion of units Physics portal Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Orders_of_magnitude_(length)&oldid=820690717" Categories: LengthOrders of magnitudeOrders of magnitude (length)Lists by lengthHidden categories: All articles with dead external linksArticles with dead external links from February 2017CS1 maint: Uses authors parameterWebarchive template webcite linksWebarchive template wayback linksCS1 French-language sources (fr)CS1 German-language sources (de)Use dmy dates from May 2017Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2012All articles containing potentially dated statementsArticles containing potentially dated statements from January 2007All articles with unsourced statementsArticles with unsourced statements from February 2009Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2016Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2010Articles containing potentially dated statements from May 2010Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2009Articles with unsourced statements from December 2008Articles with unsourced statements from June 2016Articles with unsourced statements from September 2014Articles with unsourced statements from June 2011Articles with unsourced statements from July 2009Articles containing potentially dated statements from 2002Articles with unsourced statements from November 2010All articles with vague or ambiguous timeVague or ambiguous time from April 2009Articles containing potentially dated statements from December 2008Articles containing potentially dated statements from August 2005All articles with failed verificationArticles with failed verification from December 2015Articles needing additional references from March 2011All articles needing additional referencesArticles containing potentially dated statements from October 2009Vague or ambiguous time from April 2010Articles needing additional references from April 2007Incomplete lists from November 2012Articles with unsourced statements from January 2018Articles with dead external links from May 2013


Navigation menu Personal tools Not logged inTalkContributionsCreate accountLog in Namespaces ArticleTalk Variants Views ReadEditView history More Search Navigation Main pageContentsFeatured contentCurrent eventsRandom articleDonate to WikipediaWikipedia store Interaction HelpAbout WikipediaCommunity portalRecent changesContact page Tools What links hereRelated changesUpload fileSpecial pagesPermanent linkPage informationWikidata itemCite this page Print/export Create a bookDownload as PDFPrintable version Languages AfrikaansČeštinaDeutschEestiEspañolفارسیFrançais한국어Italianoಕನ್ನಡMagyarBahasa Melayu日本語NorskPortuguêsRomânăไทยУкраїнська中文 Edit links This page was last edited on 16 January 2018, at 01:50. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization. Privacy policy About Wikipedia Disclaimers Contact Wikipedia Developers Cookie statement Mobile view (window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgPageParseReport":{"limitreport":{"cputime":"1.712","walltime":"2.004","ppvisitednodes":{"value":17036,"limit":1000000},"ppgeneratednodes":{"value":0,"limit":1500000},"postexpandincludesize":{"value":351530,"limit":2097152},"templateargumentsize":{"value":27517,"limit":2097152},"expansiondepth":{"value":20,"limit":40},"expensivefunctioncount":{"value":29,"limit":500},"entityaccesscount":{"value":0,"limit":400},"timingprofile":["100.00% 1537.324 1 -total"," 46.04% 707.726 2 Template:Reflist"," 17.66% 271.511 63 Template:Cite_web"," 12.68% 194.934 19 Template:Fix"," 9.48% 145.718 12 Template:Citation_needed"," 8.71% 133.960 24 Template:E"," 8.60% 132.210 67 Template:Category_handler"," 7.36% 113.188 22 Template:Val/delimitnum"," 6.76% 103.855 20 Template:Cite_journal"," 6.48% 99.648 17 Template:Delink"]},"scribunto":{"limitreport-timeusage":{"value":"0.830","limit":"10.000"},"limitreport-memusage":{"value":9794408,"limit":52428800}},"cachereport":{"origin":"mw1315","timestamp":"20180116015025","ttl":1900800,"transientcontent":false}}});});(window.RLQ=window.RLQ||[]).push(function(){mw.config.set({"wgBackendResponseTime":90,"wgHostname":"mw1321"});});


Orders_of_magnitude_(length) - Photos and All Basic Informations

Orders_of_magnitude_(length) More Links

1MOrder Of MagnitudeLengthEnlargeMeterPlanck LengthPlanck LengthQuantum FoamAttometreElectronQuarkString (physics)FemtometreAtomic NucleusProtonNeutronPicometreWavelengthGamma RayX-rayHydrogenNanometreDNAHelixVirusOptical SpectrumMicrometreBacteriumFogMillimetreMosquitoGolf BallDomestic CatViolinViolaFootball (association Football)MetreCelloPianoHumanAutomobileSperm WhaleAssociation FootballEiffel TowerKilometreMount EverestPanama CanalTrans-Siberian RailwayAsteroidMegametreMoonLight-secondGigametreSunLight-minuteTerametreOuter PlanetsSolar SystemPetametreLight-yearProxima CentauriExametreSpiral ArmZettametreMilky WayAndromeda GalaxyYottametreHuge-LQGHercules-Corona Borealis Great WallVisible UniverseMetrePlanck LengthPlanck LengthLoop Quantum GravityString (physics)BranesString TheoryPhysicsQuantum FoamYoctometreCross Section (physics)MeVNeutrinoZeptometrePreonsCosmic StringNeutrinoDe Broglie WavelengthProtonsLarge Hadron ColliderAttometreQuarkElectronLIGOGravitational WaveString (physics)Weak ForceMetre1 FemtometreFemtometreProtonClassical Electron RadiusAtomic Nucleus1 PicometrePicometreWavelengthGamma RayAtomic NucleiWhite DwarfCompton WavelengthElectronX-ray10 PicometresHydrogen AtomHeliumBohr Radius100 Picometres100 PicometresAngstromCovalent RadiusSulfurCovalent BondCarbonWaterProteinAlpha Helix1 NanometreNanometreCarbon NanotubeDNAMicroprocessorTransistorGate (transistor)DNATurn (biochemistry)Base PairCell Membrane10 NanometresCell WallGram StainingBacteriaWikipedia:Citation Needed10 NanometreSemiconductor Device FabricationSemiconductor NodeUltravioletFlying HeightDisk Read-and-write HeadHard Disk100 NanometresLyman-alpha LineHuman Immunodeficiency VirusVisible LightMetre1 MicrometreMicrometreMicronSpider SilkRed Blood Cell10 MicrometresTransistorIntel 4004MicroprocessorAcrylic Fiber1 MyriometrePixelCorneaThiomargarita Namibiensis1 MillimetreMillimetreFleaDual In-line Package5.56×45mm NATO1 CentimetreCentimetreFingerCredit CardISO/IEC 7810 ID-1BaseballMajor League Baseball1 DecimetreDecimetreCompact DiskRapierFencingPineSugar PineMetre1 MetreMetreVacuumSecondHistory Of The MetreRobert WadlowAEC Routemaster1 DecametreDecametreBlue WhaleNiagara FallsStatue Of Liberty1 HectometreHectometreAssociation FootballGreat Pyramid Of GizaEiffel TowerSalto AngelVenezuela1 KilometreKilometreThree Gorges DamDamStrait Of MessinaItalySicilyMount Everest1 MyriametreChallenger DeepMariana TrenchLarge Hadron ColliderParticle AcceleratorMarathon100 KilometresIAUSpaceKarman LineSuez CanalMediterranean SeaRed SeaPyreneesMountain RangeSpainFranceCeres (dwarf Planet)Metre1 MegametreMegametrePlutoPlanetMoon24 Hours Of Le MansGreat Wall Of ChinaNileAmazon RiverTrans-Canada HighwayTrans-Siberian Railway10 MegametresEquator100 MegametresJupiterMoon1 GigametreGigametreSunVolvo P180010 GigametresLight-minute100 GigametresAstronomical UnitBetelgeuse1 TerametreTerametreSaturnVY Canis MajorisNML CygniUY ScutiList Of Largest Known StarsKuiper BeltOort Cloud10 TerametresSolar SystemVoyager 1Event HorizonSupermassive Black HoleNGC 4889Black Hole100 TerametresDebris Disk51 Pegasi1 PetametrePetametreLight Year10 PetametresParsecProxima CentauriExtrasolar PlanetAlpha Centauri Bc100 PetametresGliese 581 D1 ExametreExametreSolar TwinHIP 5694810 ExametresMilky Way GalaxyHydrogen Line100 ExametresMilky Way GalaxyMilky Way Galaxy1 ZettametreZettametreKiloparsecsSupernova 1987aLarge Magellanic CloudDwarf GalaxyOrbitMilky WaySmall Magellanic CloudMalin 110 ZettametresIC 1101Andromeda GalaxyMegaparsecLocal GroupGalaxy100 ZettametresMegaparsecsVirgo ClusterGalaxy1 YottametreYottametreLocal SuperclusterObservable UniverseHorologium SuperclusterPisces–Cetus Supercluster Complex10 YottametresSloan Great WallGalactic FilamentGigaparsecHuge-LQGQuasar100 YottametresDistance Measures (cosmology)QuasarsHercules-Corona Borealis Great WallDistance Measures (cosmology)UDFj-39546284List Of The Most Distant Astronomical ObjectsComoving DistanceVisible Universe1000 Yottametres3-sphereWMAPParticle HorizonObservable UniverseCosmological InflationOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMetrePlanck LengthPhysicsInternational System Of UnitsSI Base UnitNeutrinoOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMetreMeVNeutrinoClyde CowanFrederick ReinesOrders Of MagnitudeMetreYoctometreZeptometreTop QuarkOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetrePreonCosmic StringCross Section (physics)Orders Of Magnitude (energy)GeVNeutrinoNucleonOrders Of Magnitude (energy)Orders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreZeptometreBottom QuarkOrders Of MagnitudeMetreZeptometreAttometreDe Broglie WavelengthProtonsLarge Hadron ColliderOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreLIGOGravitational WaveQuarkElectronString (physics)ElectronUp QuarkDown QuarkOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreAttometreOrders Of MagnitudeMetreAttometreFemtometreAmerican EnglishUnits Of MeasurementLengthMetric SystemMetreParticle PhysicsFermi (unit)Orders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMetreProtonNeutronCross Section (physics)Electron VoltProtonClassical Electron RadiusCross Section (physics)Orders Of Magnitude (energy)Electron VoltAlpha ParticleOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreFemtometreAtomic NucleusOrders Of MagnitudeMetreFemtometrePicometreCompton WavelengthElectronOrder Of MagnitudeLengthMetreAtomic NucleiWhite DwarfCompton WavelengthElectronX-rayOrder Of MagnitudeLengthMetreHigh-resolution Transmission Electron MicroscopyDicarbonOrder Of MagnitudeLengthMetreAngstromCovalent RadiusSulfurVan Der Waals RadiusHydrogenRutheniumTechnetiumCovalent BondCarbonSilverZirconiumThuliumElectron MicroscopeCaesiumWaterCaesiumGrapheneDiamondUnit CellLithium FluorideProteinAlpha HelixSodium ChlorideGlucoseQuartzIceCoesiteBuckminsterfullereneOrder Of MagnitudeLengthMetreÅngströmAlbert EinsteinPhospholipidMicroprocessorTransistorGate (transistor)Disk Read-and-write HeadHard DiskDNATurn (biochemistry)Base PairAlbuminsProteinMoleculePhospholipidHaemoglobinCell WallGram StainingBacteriaOrder Of MagnitudeLengthMetreAngstromSquareCubeCircleSphereTobacco Mosaic VirusVirus (biology)Wikipedia:Citation NeededCell WallGram-positive BacteriaBacteriaFlagellumMicroprocessorUltravioletVirusFlying HeightDisk Read-and-write HeadHard DiskAIDSVirus (biology)Mesoporous SilicaEnlargeHair's BreadthOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreNanometreMicrometreSurgical MaskSmokeWikipedia:Citation NeededULPAWikipedia:Citation NeededHuman Immunodeficiency VirusCompact DiscRabiesMycoplasmaUltravioletHEPAWikipedia:Citation NeededViolet (color)ColorVisible SpectrumIndigoColorVisible SpectrumBlueColorVisible SpectrumCyanColorVisible SpectrumGreenColorVisible SpectrumYellowColorVisible SpectrumOrange (colour)ColorVisible SpectrumRedColorVisible SpectrumInfrared RadiationEnlargeOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMicrometreInfrared RadiationSquare (geometry)Orders Of Magnitude (area)Cube (geometry)Orders Of Magnitude (less Than One Cubic Millimetre)BacteriumWikipedia:Citation NeededLysosomeE. ColiYeastSpermatozoonAnthrax DiseaseWikipedia:Citation NeededCell NucleusCell (biology)Wikipedia:Citation NeededRed Blood CellSpider SilkChloroplastWikipedia:Citation NeededCompact CassetteWikipedia:Citation NeededFogMistCloudWikipedia:Citation NeededEnlargeOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMicrometreCottonTransistorIntel 4004MicroprocessorRed Blood CellWikipedia:Citation NeededDust MiteCarbon Dioxide LaserSilkWikipedia:Citation NeededTwipWoolThou (unit Of Length)Thou (unit Of Length)Skin CellEuglena GracilisWikipedia:Citation NeededLiverWikipedia:Citation NeededSiltSperm CellEnlargeParameciumOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMicrometreMillimetreMyria-SI PrefixesInternational System Of UnitsNaked EyeHuman HairPaintDustPlanck ScaleObservable UniverseHumanOvumSperm CellDemodex MiteHair FollicleParameciumDust MitePixelAmoeba ProteusMicroelectromechanical SystemsWikipedia:Citation NeededSandSaltSugarCorneaThiomargarita NamibiensisISO/IEC 7810EnlargeAntOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMetreInchSquare (geometry)1 E-6 M²FleaDual In-line PackageAntRice5.56×45mm NATOPaedophryne AmauensisVertebrateSunflower Seed7.62×51mm NATOPaedocypris ProgeneticaFishEnlargeFingernailOrders Of MagnitudeMetreMillimetreInchSquareOrders Of Magnitude (area)Cube (geometry)Orders Of Magnitude (one Cubic Millimetre To One Cubic Metre)Coffee BeanFingernailBeeDiceMosquitoJaragua SphaeroReptileThorius ArboreusSalamanderFingerInchAttoparsecParsecQuail EggsMotion PicturesPhotographic FilmGolfChicken EggHummingbirdBirdRubik's CubeAppleBaseballCredit CardSpeckled PadloperTurtle10cm (band)EnlargeFootOrders Of MagnitudeCentimetreDecimetreMillimetreInchSquare (geometry)Orders Of Magnitude (area)Cube (geometry)Orders Of Magnitude (one Cubic Millimetre To One Cubic Metre)LitreUltra High FrequencyPicosecondISM Band21 Cm LineHyperfine StructureUltra High FrequencyNanosecondHand (unit)Compact DiscBic PenBall (association Football)RulerFoot (length)RapierFencingYardCervixChildbirthWikipedia:Citation NeededPotatoTitanus GiganteusWikipedia:Citation NeededBananaFootWikipedia:Citation NeededNanosecondButterflyQueen Alexandra's BirdwingWikipedia:Citation NeededDomestic CatPizoteWikipedia:Citation NeededPineSugar PineMeteoroidEnlargeVitruvian ManOrders Of MagnitudeMetreMetreDecimetreCentimetreMillimetreInchFoot (length)Square (geometry)1 E0 M²Cube (geometry)1 E0 M²1 E0 M³Circle1 E0 M²Sphere1 E+1 M²1 E0 M³DoorknobDoorBeach BallStandard GaugeStarr Bumble Bee IIRadioMiniAEC RoutemasterAssociation Football PitchJavier SotomayorBasketballMike Powell (athlete)Homo FloresiensisPizoteAndamaneseHumanHumanSunflowerRobert WadlowWingspanWandering AlbatrossElephantGiraffeBaluchitheriumArgentavisHuman Gastrointestinal TractMeteoroid2008 TC3AsteroidEarth's AtmosphereEnlargeBlue WhaleOrders Of MagnitudeMetreDecametreMetreDecimetreCentimetreMillimetreFoot (length)Square (geometry)1 E+2 M²Shortwave1 E7 HzMega-HertzLuxor ObeliskPlace De La ConcordeParisShortwave1 E7 HzMega-HertzLighthouseSavudrijaSloveniaShortwaveSplit Point LighthouseAireys Inlet, VictoriaVictoria (Australia)AustraliaChannel TunnelShortwaveRoad TrainLeaning Tower Of PisaPyramid Of DjoserWikipedia:Citation NeededBoeing 747-400Antonov An-124 RuslanBayeux TapestryAssociation FootballBoeing 747-8Antonov An-225 MriyaStatue Of LibertyBig BenShortwave1 E6 HzTennis CourtInternational Basketball FederationBasketball CourtNational Basketball AssociationBaseballCricketBaseballAmerican FootballYardCanadian FootballYardAssociation FootballAmerican FootballYardFootball PitchUEFAUEFA Stadium CategoriesDigestive TractWikipedia:Citation NeededWhale SharkFishQuetzalcoatlusPterosaurGiant SquidColossal SquidInvertebrateCircles Of LatitudeAxial TiltSauroposeidonDinosaurLeedsichthysFishHigh ForceBlue WhaleSupersaurusDinosaurWikipedia:Citation NeededChannel TunnelWikipedia:Citation NeededNiagara FallsWestern Hemlock1998 KY26Meteoroid2008 HJMeteoroidEnlargeEnlargeDriver Location SignsM27 MotorwayHampshireOrders Of MagnitudeMetreKilometreHectometreFoot (length)1 E+4 M²Li (Chinese Unit)NanosecondWavelengthMediumwave1 E6 HzDriver Location SignsGreat Pyramid Of GizaKingda KaRadio1 E6 HzBudaPest (city)The New York Times BuildingChrysler BuildingEiffel TowerAucklandSky Tower (Auckland)Southern HemisphereWikipedia:Manual Of Style/Dates And NumbersMillau ViaductWikipedia:Manual Of Style/Dates And NumbersEmpire State BuildingWorld's Tallest StructuresWikipedia:Manual Of Style/Dates And NumbersKnock NevisSupertankerCN TowerRadio1 E5 HzKVLY-TV MastWarsaw Radio MastBurj KhalifaMediumwave1 E5 HzWorld Record Progression 100 M MenCanadian FootballYardAssociation FootballAssociation FootballAmerican FootballAustralian FootballAustralian FootballCanadian FootballTreeSequoia SempervirensLake GenevaSoundSpeed Of SoundSalto AngelVenezuela99942 Apophis25143 ItokawaAsteroidUnmanned Space MissionEnlargeMount FujiOrders Of MagnitudeLengthKilometreMetreKilometreMetreMileYardFoot (length)InchesCentimetreMillimetreSquare (geometry)1 E+6 M²Square KilometreCirclePiLong Wave1 E5 HzKilohertzGolden Gate BridgeNautical MileArc MinuteLatitudeAkashi Kaikyō BridgeThree Gorges DamDamAkashi Kaikyō BridgeSuspension BridgeTanggula Mountain PassTanggula MountainsRailwayChileWikipedia:VerifiabilityList Of Longest RunwaysPalm Jebel AliArtificial IslandDubaiThe World (archipelago)DubaiWorld MapWikipedia:VerifiabilityHelp:Introduction To Referencing With Wiki Markup/1Help:Maintenance Template RemovalList Of Highest MountainsLake BaikalRussiaFresh WaterLakeMount KosciuszkoGeography Of AustraliaManhattanMont BlancAlpsCarstensz PyramidOceaniaMount VinsonAntarcticaMount DamavandIranMount ElbrusEuropeMount KilimanjaroAfricaMount LoganCanadaDenaliNorth AmericaAconcaguaSouth AmericaCayman TrenchCaribbean SeaMount EverestEarthNepalChina1620 GeographosJupiter's Natural SatellitesJupiterDactyl (asteroid)Asteroid Moon5535 Annefrank3753 CruithnePSR B1257+12Themisto (moon)JupiterVela PulsarCallirrhoe (moon)PSR B1919+21EnlargeStrait Of GibraltarOrders Of MagnitudeLengthKilometreMetreMyria-Myrio-SI PrefixesInternational System Of UnitsEnlargeRhineBaselDecimal MarkGermanyMetreMileScandinavian MileNorwaySwedenParasangIranTurkeyMarathonConcordeLarge Hadron ColliderParticle AcceleratorBalloonLake Pontchartrain CausewayLouisianaChannel TunnelSeikan TunnelPanama CanalMauna KeaHawaiiChallenger DeepMariana TrenchTroposphereGibraltar StraitManhattan1931 Dogger Bank EarthquakeDogger BankNorth SeaEnglish ChannelStrait Of DoverStratosphereBering StraitNeutron StarSunDeimos (moon)MarsLeda (moon)JupiterPan (moon)SaturnPhobos (moon)MarsOlympus MonsMarsSolar SystemEarthEquatorial BulgeNaiad (moon)NeptuneEnlargeSuez CanalFédération Aéronautique InternationaleSpaceflightOrders Of MagnitudeLengthKilometreMetreKarman LineOuter SpaceGiridihBokaro Steel CityHigh Speed 1ScudSuez CanalDanyang–Kunshan Grand BridgeParis MétroGrand Union CanalMadrid MetroScudInternational Space StationLondon UndergroundLondonParisDublinLondonAs The Crow FliesScudHubble Space TelescopeIndy 500LatitudeMumbaiNashikSognefjordenFjordPuneEnglish ChannelPyreneesGeography Of SwedenSan FranciscoLos Angeles, CaliforniaAs The Crow FliesBordeaux–ParisWikipedia:Manual Of Style/Dates And NumbersGeography Of FinlandGeography Of SwedenOm RiverSydneyMelbourneHume HighwayRiver DouroBerlinStockholmWashington, DCChicago, IllinoisAs The Crow FliesFédération Aéronautique InternationaleSpaceflightAmalthea (moon)JupiterValles MarinerisPhoebe (moon)SaturnMillisecondNereid (moon)NeptuneLow Earth OrbitProteus (moon)NeptuneAsteroid4 VestaMiranda (moon)UranusCeres (dwarf Planet)AsteroidEnlargeMoonDwarf PlanetMarsMercury (planet)MoonPlutoHaumea (dwarf Planet)Orders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMegametreKilometre1 E+6 MMileSquare (geometry)1 E+12 M²Iran-Pakistan-India Gas PipelineCasablancaRomeAlaska HighwayInterstate 95Houlton, MaineMiami, FloridaU.S. Route 1Fort Kent, MaineKey West, FloridaUnited StatesInterstate 90Dingo FenceGreat Wall Of ChinaTrans-Canada HighwayVictoria, British ColumbiaSt. John's, NewfoundlandPrudhoe BayKey West, FloridaGreat Wall Of ChinaTrans-Siberian RailwayMunda Biddi TrailWestern AustraliaAustraliaParis–Brest–ParisBathurst 10001000 Km Brands Hatch1000 Km Buenos Aires1000 Km Donington1000 Km Monza1000 Km Nürburgring1000 Km Silverstone1000 Km Spa1000 Km Suzuka1000 Km ZeltwegSan DiegoEl PasoAs The Crow FliesBeijingHong KongAs The Crow FliesAtlantic OceanDanubeGeography Of SwedenGeography Of NorwayVolgaYellow RiverAtlantic OceanDublinMississippi RiverMissouri RiverYangtze RiverAmazon RiverNile RiverEarthDublinEllipsoidDwarf PlanetHaumeaCharon (moon)Pluto50000 QuaoarIapetus (moon)SaturnTitania (moon)UranusHaumea (dwarf Planet)Eris (dwarf Planet)Trans-Neptunian ObjectPlutoTriton (moon)NeptuneEuropa (moon)Galilean SatelliteJupiterEarthMoonIo (moon)Callisto (moon)Mercury (planet)Titan (moon)Ganymede (moon)Solar SystemEarth RadiusMarsEnlargeUranusNeptuneEarthSiriusVenusWikipedia:VerifiabilityHelp:Introduction To Referencing With Wiki Markup/1Help:Maintenance Template RemovalOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMegametreKilometreMileSquare (geometry)1 E+14 M²Square KilometreCircleKievVladivostokTrans-Siberian RailwayNational Highway Development ProjectIndiaSEA-ME-WE 3Norden, Lower SaxonyOkinawaNational Highways (India)ExosphereMeridian ArcNorth PoleEquatorMetreMid-ocean RidgeSiriusWhite DwarfVenusEarthMeteoroid2004 FU162Great Red SpotPlutoCharon (moon)Asteroid99942 ApophisGeostationary OrbitEarthEarthNeptuneUranusEnlargeEarthMoonSaturnOGLE-TR-122bJupiter1 E7 MOrders Of MagnitudeLengthMetreMegametreKilometreMileHD 149026 BGas GiantLeague (unit)Jules VerneTwenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea2MASS J0523-1403StarSaturnJupiterSolar SystemTRAPPIST-1OGLE-TR-122bProxima CentauriRed DwarfWASP-12bTrES-4Light SecondLightVacuumSecondSpeed Of LightWASP-17bCT Cha BOrbit Of The MoonJupiterEuropa (moon)HD 100546 BList Of Largest ExoplanetsPlanetEnlargeGamma OrionisAlgolSun1 E8 MMetreGigametreMetreSaturnTitan (moon)SunJames Webb Space TelescopeComet LexellEarthCometAlgolComet HalleyLaser Interferometer Space AntennaGamma OrionisEvent HorizonSagittarius A*Supermassive Black HoleMilky WayEnlargeDistanceMetreGigametreKilometreAstronomical UnitComet HyakutakeEarthLight-minuteHeliostationary OrbitApsisMercury (planet)PerigeeMarsRigelBlue SupergiantStarEarthAldebaranRed GiantApsisNeso (moon)ApsisNatural SatellitePlanetNeptuneEnlargeOrders Of MagnitudeMetreGigametreKilometreAstronomical UnitVenusSunEarthAstronomical UnitSagittarius A*Supermassive Black HoleMilky WayMarsComet HyakutakeUlysses ProbeEarthJupiterEnlargeEnlargeDistanceMetreTerametreKilometreAstronomical UnitLight-hourAntaresSaturnSunVY Canis MajorisList Of Largest StarsStarKY CygniUY ScutiVY Canis MajorisUranusApsisPlutoNeptuneKuiper Belt136199 ErisApsisPlutoKuiper BeltOort CloudEnlargeComet Hale-BoppLight-dayHeliosphereVoyager 1Pioneer 10DistanceMetreTerametreKilometreAstronomical UnitVoyager 1HeliosphereApsis90377 SednaHeliosphereVoyager 1Pioneer 11Solar System136199 ErisApsisHeliospherePioneer 10Voyager 2Voyager 1Voyager 1Voyager 1Light-dayCometHale-BoppEnlargeWikipedia:WikiProject ListsDistanceMetreTerametreKilometreAstronomical UnitApsis90377 SednaSchwarzschild RadiusH1821+643Black HolesLight-weekCometComet HyakutakeOrbitStingray NebulaLight-monthEnlargeLight YearSunCat's Eye NebulaBarnard 68Comet 1910 A1DistanceMetrePetametreKilometreAstronomical UnitLight YearCat's Eye NebulaBok GlobuleBarnard 68Oort CloudAstronomical UnitLight YearApsisGreat Daylight Comet Of 1910Light YearEnlargePetameterEnlargePetameterMetrePetametreAstronomical UnitLight YearOort CloudGravitational FieldWikipedia:Citation NeededParsecProxima CentauriSunSiriusEnlargeWikipedia:WikiProject ListsDistanceMetrePetametreLight YearTau CetiOrion NebulaVegaBeta Canum VenaticorumSunArcturusTRAPPIST-1Capella (star)AldebaranRegulusAlgolEnlargeDistanceMetreExametreLight YearMessier 13Globular ClusterOmega CentauriGlobular ClusterStarCanopus (star)HipparcosTarantula NebulaWikipedia:Citation NeededBetelgeuseHelix NebulaAquarius (constellation)RigelOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceExametreMetreLight YearOrion NebulaGalactic PlaneMilky WayGalaxySunNGC 604ParsecDenebHipparcosOGLE-TR-56Extrasolar PlanetExtrasolar PlanetBoomerang Nebula1 E0 KGlobular ClusterMessier 4Extrasolar PlanetPSR B1620-26 BPerseus Spiral ArmEta CarinaeOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceExametreMetreLight YearSmall Magellanic CloudDwarf GalaxyMilky WayOGLE-2005-BLG-390LbEarthPlanetCanis Major Dwarf GalaxyMilky WaySagittarius Dwarf Elliptical GalaxyMilky WaySIUnits Of MeasurementLengthMetric SystemMetreOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceZettametreMetreLight YearLarge Magellanic CloudSatellite GalaxyMilky WaySmall Magellanic CloudIntergalactic WandererGlobular ClusterLeo I Dwarf GalaxyMilky WayGalaxyOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceZettametreMetreLight YearAndromeda GalaxyParsecIC 10Local GroupGalaxyLocal GroupGalaxyElliptical GalaxyIC 1101Sculptor GalaxySculptor GroupMaffei 1Elliptical GalaxyMaffei 1 Group Of GalaxiesOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceZettametreMetreLight YearCentaurus APinwheel GalaxySombrero GalaxyVirgo ClusterGalaxy ClusterFornax ClusterEridanus ClusterSIUnits Of MeasurementLengthMetric SystemMetreOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceMetreLight YearGamma Ray BurstGRB 980425Centaurus ClusterGalaxiesSuperclusterLocal SuperclusterGalactic YearComa ClusterStephan's QuintetGreat Wall (astronomy)UniverseShapley SuperclusterEridanus SupervoidEnlargeOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceYottametreMetreLight-yearUniverseRedshiftPhysical CosmologySloan Great WallQuasar3C 273Distance Measures (cosmology)2dF Galaxy Redshift SurveyHuge-LQGSupernovaHubble Deep Field NorthGamma Ray BurstGRB 990123Hercules-Corona Borealis Great WallList Of Largest Cosmic StructuresOrders Of MagnitudeDistanceYottametreMetreLight YearUniverseRedshiftPhysical CosmologyDistance Measures (cosmology)QuasarList Of QuasarsCosmic Microwave Background RadiationUniverseComoving DistanceEvent HorizonObservable UniverseNon-SI Unit PrefixesObservable UniverseInfinityShape Of The UniversePhysicsDiameterSolar SystemExtrasolar PlanetTrans-Neptunian ObjectGoogolGoogolplexList Of Examples Of LengthsFernando QuevedoScientific AmericanCharge RadiusProtonBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierCross Section (physics)ProtonNational Institute Of Standards And TechnologyUniversity Of California, San DiegoDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-0-470-25818-7Wikipedia:Link RotUniversity Of California, BerkeleyInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-81-312-1158-8PhysicsDigital Object IdentifierPubMed CentralPubMed IdentifierCategory:CS1 Maint: Uses Authors ParameterGuinness World RecordsBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierWebCiteThe Sydney Morning HeraldAustralian Associated PressWayback MachineArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierKansas State UniversityInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-7167-1843-XInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/978-1-85233-507-6Digital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/0-471-29298-2Comité International Des Poids Et MesuresBureau Des LongitudesÉcole PolytechniqueNational Bureau Of StandardsMyriameterStereMillier (unit)Tonneau (unit)QuintalMyriagramUS Department Of CommerceNational Bureau Of StandardsLibrary Of Congress Control NumberDigital Object IdentifierPubMed CentralPubMed IdentifierBad AstronomyMajor League BaseballMarylebone Cricket ClubBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierEverything2Xinhua News AgencyInternational Standard Book NumberSpecial:BookSources/3-7686-1036-5University Of Wisconsin PressInternational Association Of Athletics FederationsPopular MechanicsBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierPubMed IdentifierUniversity Of Nebraska - LincolnAgence France-PresseNASAArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierArXivBibcodeBibcodeLight YearLight YearArcsecondsAmerican ScientistArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierAstronomy And AstrophysicsArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierThe Astronomical JournalBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierAstrophysical JournalArXivBibcodeDigital Object IdentifierLocal GroupWikipedia:Link RotTemplate:Orders Of MagnitudeTemplate Talk:Orders Of MagnitudeOrder Of MagnitudeOrders Of Magnitude (acceleration)Orders Of Magnitude (angular Velocity)Orders Of Magnitude (area)Orders Of Magnitude (bit Rate)Orders Of Magnitude (capacitance)Orders Of Magnitude (charge)Computer Performance By Orders Of MagnitudeOrders Of Magnitude (currency)Orders Of Magnitude (current)Orders Of Magnitude (data)Orders Of Magnitude (density)Orders Of Magnitude (energy)Energy DensityOrders Of Magnitude (energy Flow Density)Orders Of Magnitude (entropy)Orders Of Magnitude (force)Orders Of Magnitude (frequency)Orders Of Magnitude (inductance)Orders Of Magnitude (illuminance)Orders Of Magnitude (luminance)Orders Of Magnitude (luminous Flux)Orders Of Magnitude (magnetic Field)Orders Of Magnitude (mass)Orders Of Magnitude (molar Concentration)Orders Of Magnitude (numbers)Orders Of Magnitude (power)Orders Of Magnitude (pressure)Orders Of Magnitude (probability)Orders Of Magnitude (radiation)Orders Of Magnitude (resistance)Sound PressureOrders Of Magnitude (specific Energy)Orders Of Magnitude (specific Heat Capacity)Orders Of Magnitude (speed)Orders Of Magnitude (temperature)Orders Of Magnitude (time)Orders Of Magnitude (viscosity)Orders Of Magnitude (voltage)Orders Of Magnitude (volume)Back-of-the-envelope CalculationFermi ProblemPower Of 10Metric PrefixMacroscopic ScaleMicroscopic ScaleQuantum RealmEarth's Location In The UniverseCosmic ViewTo The Moon And BeyondCosmic ZoomPowers Of Ten (film)Cosmic VoyageCosmic EyeBook:Orders Of MagnitudeCategory:Orders Of MagnitudePortal:ScienceTemplate:Units Of Length Used In AstronomyTemplate Talk:Units Of Length Used In AstronomyUnit Of LengthAstronomyAstronomical System Of UnitsEarth RadiusLight-secondSolar RadiusGigametreAstronomical UnitTerametreLight-yearParsecKiloparsecMegaparsecGigaparsecCosmic Distance LadderConversion Of UnitsPortal:PhysicsHelp:CategoryCategory:LengthCategory:Orders Of MagnitudeCategory:Orders Of Magnitude (length)Category:Lists By LengthCategory:All Articles With Dead External LinksCategory:Articles With Dead External Links From February 2017Category:CS1 Maint: Uses Authors ParameterCategory:Webarchive Template Webcite LinksCategory:Webarchive Template Wayback LinksCategory:CS1 French-language Sources (fr)Category:CS1 German-language Sources (de)Category:Use Dmy Dates From May 2017Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From 2012Category:All Articles Containing Potentially Dated StatementsCategory:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From January 2007Category:All Articles With Unsourced StatementsCategory:Articles With Unsourced Statements From February 2009Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From 2016Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From 2010Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From May 2010Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From 2009Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From December 2008Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From June 2016Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From September 2014Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From June 2011Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From July 2009Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From 2002Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From November 2010Category:All Articles With Vague Or Ambiguous TimeCategory:Vague Or Ambiguous Time From April 2009Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From December 2008Category:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From August 2005Category:All Articles With Failed VerificationCategory:Articles With Failed Verification From December 2015Category:Articles Needing Additional References From March 2011Category:All Articles Needing Additional ReferencesCategory:Articles Containing Potentially Dated Statements From October 2009Category:Vague Or Ambiguous Time From April 2010Category:Articles Needing Additional References From April 2007Category:Incomplete Lists From November 2012Category:Articles With Unsourced Statements From January 2018Category:Articles With Dead External Links From May 2013Discussion About Edits From This IP Address [n]A List Of Edits Made From This IP Address [y]View The Content Page [c]Discussion About The Content Page [t]Edit This Page [e]Visit The Main Page [z]Guides To Browsing WikipediaFeatured Content – The Best Of WikipediaFind Background Information On Current EventsLoad A Random Article [x]Guidance On How To Use And Edit WikipediaFind Out About WikipediaAbout The Project, What You Can Do, Where To Find ThingsA List Of Recent Changes In The Wiki [r]List Of All English Wikipedia Pages Containing Links To This Page [j]Recent Changes In Pages Linked From This Page [k]Upload Files [u]A List Of All Special Pages [q]Wikipedia:AboutWikipedia:General Disclaimer